Blue Moon Studio Retreat Locals Guide

Laura
Blue Moon Studio Retreat Locals Guide

Food scene around Mt Pleasant & Charleston

Blue Moon Studio Retreat Locals Guide Welcome to Charleston, Mount Pleasant, and the Old Village! We’ve collected a list of some of our favorite spots to visit, eat, and soak up the local area, but you might want to do some exploring on your own because this list is far from comprehensive. We value your feedback about what you love (and what you don’t), so if you discover a place you think we should add, please let us know. And if you see a place you’re interested in and a quick search on google or maps doesn’t answer all your questions, we’ll be happy to help. Enjoy! Coffee Brown Fox: very Old Village and a 10 or 15 minute walk from here. If you like a little spice, try the Mexican Fox Mocha. (Helpful to know: Often a wait, outdoor seating only, and closed on Sundays.) Vintage Coffee Cafe: also just a 15 minute walk from here. Hosts both indoor and outdoor seating and offers breakfast as well. (Right across from Bottles off of Coleman.) Cooper River Roasters: if you want to grab coffee to go, this is the place. We think it’s the best coffee around. (Although the cafe is very small and seating is limited, a spot is usually available if you’d like to stay for a while.) Kudu Coffee & Craft Beer: one of our favorite coffee spots in Charleston and a real opportunity to get a feel for Downtown. And as you see in the name, it isn’t just for coffee. Kudu is just off King Street and in the heart of one of the most bustling areas in the city. (Perfect post-coffee experience: take your coffee buzz across King Street to nearby Record Stop Charleston and brouse vintage vinyl in this popular shop.) Breakfast Paige’s: probably the most popular place in Mount Pleasant for breakfast and lunch, especially on the weekends. If chicken and waffles is new to you and sounds interesting, this is the place to try it. If you’re in a hurry, this might not be the spot since there’s usually a wait, but they serve alcohol, so….. Viscous Biscuit: another very popular locals breakfast/brunch spot in Mount Pleasant. The portions are large - this isn’t a fast food sausage biscuit! The Shelter: offers both a bustling brunch crowd and a decent nightlife, super close to Shem Creek. Think a little more Bloody Mary than breakfast menu, and you get the idea. The Co-op: if you want to take a ride out to the beach and have breakfast, The Co-op is right across the Ben Sawyer Bridge on Sullivans Island. It’s probably the most reasonably priced breakfast food you’ll find around here, particularly if you’re looking to start your day more on the lighter side. Co-op has lunch sandwiches, too, but they’re best known locally for their Frose’ (yes, an alcohol slushy). Sea Biscuit: another beach spot for breakfast is Sea Biscuit on the Isle of Palms. They’ve been in the same spot for decades. After you finish eating, you’re only a block away from a walk on the beach. Millers All Day: if you’re looking to get an early start on your Downtown Charleston experience, Millers is a great place for breakfast. It’s on King Street half a block from Broad, so it’s a perfect place to eat before starting your South of Broad walking tour. Lunch/Supper Coastal Crust: a unique pizza place very close by, Coastal Crust serves good beer and thin-crust pizza in an outdoor setting under the trees. Good to know: they often have live music on weekend nights, which is a pro, but also, young families love this place and it’s designed for children to run around, which might be a pro or a con for you. Ty’s Roadside: check out their menu to see if it’s what you want, but we love the atmosphere and the food, and they have a nice selection of beverages. Plus, it’s a ten minute walk from here. The Southern: more of a bar, with pub type food, but true local atmosphere with frequent live music on weekends. Paiges: a longer description is above in the breakfast section, but Paiges does lunch and supper as well. It’s more of a dinner or meat-and-three place, if that’s what you’re looking for. The Post House Inn: the most upscale restaurant within walking distance (four minute drive, 20-minute walk), this restaurant is really in a different category than the places above. The food and experience have never disappointed us, although getting a table can be a challenge. In an historic building on the main street of the Old Village, The Post House puts you in what might be the most charming part of Mount Pleasant. (Helpful to know: call ahead for a reservation.) Shem Creek Shem Creek gets its own section because it’s so well known and so close by. You’ll find nearly a dozen restaurants on the water and several others in the surrounding blocks. If you’re looking for the quintessential Shem Creek experience - think festive, with seafood, music, and a party atmosphere - you can try Saltwater Cowboy, Red’s, or Tavern and Table. Across the creek and maybe a little more mellow, you’ll find Vickery’s and Water’s Edge Restaurant…a bonus with these last two is that they are right on the Shem Creek Boardwalk, which is a great creekside stroll any time of day. Shem Creek Bar and Grill: great seafood and right on the water, but on a quieter part of the creek. If you hit it at the right time of day, you can have a drink at their fantastic dock bar, which is a very small venue where creek boaters often tie up and join you for a beverage. The Mill Street Tavern: if you don’t want to limit yourself to just seafood but still want to be on Shem Creek, the tavern is your spot. The menu is eclectic and the drinks are many. If the weather’s good, which is most of the year, you won’t want to miss their rooftop deck. The Wreck of Richard and Charlene: arguably the most authentic spot on Shem Creek, The Wreck isn’t fancy but the seafood is the real deal. (And if it matters to you, some scenes in Outer Banks were shot here.) Nearby Grocery/Beverage Stores (There are reusable shopping bags for your use hanging on the entryway hooks) Publix: 1435 Ben Sawyer Blvd. Harris Teeter: 1220 Ben Sawyer Blvd. Trader Joes: 401 Johnnie Dodds Blvd. Whole Foods: 923 Houston Northcutt Blvd. New York Butcher Shoppe: 1260 Ben Sawyer Blvd. Kudzu Bakery & Market: 1100 Bowman Rd. Bottles: 610 Coleman Blvd.
170 íbúar mæla með
Charleston
170 íbúar mæla með
Blue Moon Studio Retreat Locals Guide Welcome to Charleston, Mount Pleasant, and the Old Village! We’ve collected a list of some of our favorite spots to visit, eat, and soak up the local area, but you might want to do some exploring on your own because this list is far from comprehensive. We value your feedback about what you love (and what you don’t), so if you discover a place you think we should add, please let us know. And if you see a place you’re interested in and a quick search on google or maps doesn’t answer all your questions, we’ll be happy to help. Enjoy! Coffee Brown Fox: very Old Village and a 10 or 15 minute walk from here. If you like a little spice, try the Mexican Fox Mocha. (Helpful to know: Often a wait, outdoor seating only, and closed on Sundays.) Vintage Coffee Cafe: also just a 15 minute walk from here. Hosts both indoor and outdoor seating and offers breakfast as well. (Right across from Bottles off of Coleman.) Cooper River Roasters: if you want to grab coffee to go, this is the place. We think it’s the best coffee around. (Although the cafe is very small and seating is limited, a spot is usually available if you’d like to stay for a while.) Kudu Coffee & Craft Beer: one of our favorite coffee spots in Charleston and a real opportunity to get a feel for Downtown. And as you see in the name, it isn’t just for coffee. Kudu is just off King Street and in the heart of one of the most bustling areas in the city. (Perfect post-coffee experience: take your coffee buzz across King Street to nearby Record Stop Charleston and brouse vintage vinyl in this popular shop.) Breakfast Paige’s: probably the most popular place in Mount Pleasant for breakfast and lunch, especially on the weekends. If chicken and waffles is new to you and sounds interesting, this is the place to try it. If you’re in a hurry, this might not be the spot since there’s usually a wait, but they serve alcohol, so….. Viscous Biscuit: another very popular locals breakfast/brunch spot in Mount Pleasant. The portions are large - this isn’t a fast food sausage biscuit! The Shelter: offers both a bustling brunch crowd and a decent nightlife, super close to Shem Creek. Think a little more Bloody Mary than breakfast menu, and you get the idea. The Co-op: if you want to take a ride out to the beach and have breakfast, The Co-op is right across the Ben Sawyer Bridge on Sullivans Island. It’s probably the most reasonably priced breakfast food you’ll find around here, particularly if you’re looking to start your day more on the lighter side. Co-op has lunch sandwiches, too, but they’re best known locally for their Frose’ (yes, an alcohol slushy). Sea Biscuit: another beach spot for breakfast is Sea Biscuit on the Isle of Palms. They’ve been in the same spot for decades. After you finish eating, you’re only a block away from a walk on the beach. Millers All Day: if you’re looking to get an early start on your Downtown Charleston experience, Millers is a great place for breakfast. It’s on King Street half a block from Broad, so it’s a perfect place to eat before starting your South of Broad walking tour. Lunch/Supper Coastal Crust: a unique pizza place very close by, Coastal Crust serves good beer and thin-crust pizza in an outdoor setting under the trees. Good to know: they often have live music on weekend nights, which is a pro, but also, young families love this place and it’s designed for children to run around, which might be a pro or a con for you. Ty’s Roadside: check out their menu to see if it’s what you want, but we love the atmosphere and the food, and they have a nice selection of beverages. Plus, it’s a ten minute walk from here. The Southern: more of a bar, with pub type food, but true local atmosphere with frequent live music on weekends. Paiges: a longer description is above in the breakfast section, but Paiges does lunch and supper as well. It’s more of a dinner or meat-and-three place, if that’s what you’re looking for. The Post House Inn: the most upscale restaurant within walking distance (four minute drive, 20-minute walk), this restaurant is really in a different category than the places above. The food and experience have never disappointed us, although getting a table can be a challenge. In an historic building on the main street of the Old Village, The Post House puts you in what might be the most charming part of Mount Pleasant. (Helpful to know: call ahead for a reservation.) Shem Creek Shem Creek gets its own section because it’s so well known and so close by. You’ll find nearly a dozen restaurants on the water and several others in the surrounding blocks. If you’re looking for the quintessential Shem Creek experience - think festive, with seafood, music, and a party atmosphere - you can try Saltwater Cowboy, Red’s, or Tavern and Table. Across the creek and maybe a little more mellow, you’ll find Vickery’s and Water’s Edge Restaurant…a bonus with these last two is that they are right on the Shem Creek Boardwalk, which is a great creekside stroll any time of day. Shem Creek Bar and Grill: great seafood and right on the water, but on a quieter part of the creek. If you hit it at the right time of day, you can have a drink at their fantastic dock bar, which is a very small venue where creek boaters often tie up and join you for a beverage. The Mill Street Tavern: if you don’t want to limit yourself to just seafood but still want to be on Shem Creek, the tavern is your spot. The menu is eclectic and the drinks are many. If the weather’s good, which is most of the year, you won’t want to miss their rooftop deck. The Wreck of Richard and Charlene: arguably the most authentic spot on Shem Creek, The Wreck isn’t fancy but the seafood is the real deal. (And if it matters to you, some scenes in Outer Banks were shot here.) Nearby Grocery/Beverage Stores (There are reusable shopping bags for your use hanging on the entryway hooks) Publix: 1435 Ben Sawyer Blvd. Harris Teeter: 1220 Ben Sawyer Blvd. Trader Joes: 401 Johnnie Dodds Blvd. Whole Foods: 923 Houston Northcutt Blvd. New York Butcher Shoppe: 1260 Ben Sawyer Blvd. Kudzu Bakery & Market: 1100 Bowman Rd. Bottles: 610 Coleman Blvd.

To See and Do Around Mt Pleasant & Charleston

To see and do Pitt Street Bridge: a beautiful spot to catch sunrise or sunset, the Pitt Street Bridge is a long strip of causeway that runs across the marsh from the Old VIllage toward Sullivans Island, ending just before the Intercoastal Waterway and offering amazing views of Charleston Harbor (especially for that sunset). It’s the perfect place for a stroll, or If you’re a runner, try it as an out-and-back destination. (From here, it’s something in the range of a 30 minute run to the end of Pitt Street Bridge and back.) Alhambra Hall: if you want to see a beautiful sunset without leaving the neighborhood, and you love dogs, try Alhambra. It’s a four minute drive or less than a 20 minute walk. Farmer's Markets: During the spring and summer months both Charleston and Mt Pleasant host a farmer's market. Charleston's takes place on Saturdays at Marion Square and Mt Pleasant's takes place on Tuesday afternoon/early evening at Moultrie Middle School outdoor pavilion (walking distance from here.) The nearby beaches: Sullivans Island is closer (about 2.5 miles); Isle of Palms has bigger waves. Both can have parking challenges on busy summer days, but both are worth it if you’re looking for a wonderful beach day. Please pay attention to what is allowed and not allowed on the signs leading to the beach; we have seen people get ticketed. Folly Beach is located past James Island and is a bit of a drive, but the waves are bigger there if you're interested in surfing, and the laid back beach bars and restaurants are worth checking out. (Good to know: on perfect-weather days during the beach season, expect traffic going to any of these beaches.) Shem Creek Boardwalk: as the name implies, this walk goes right along Shem Creek, and on any given day, you’ll see a variety of local birds and local boaters. Dolphin frequent the creek, too. Go there for a stroll, the sunset, or some exercise, but know that you can always stop for a creekside beverage or meal at any number of spots. Fort Moultrie: history is everywhere when you are in the Charleston area, and Fort Moultrie, located on Sullivans Island, is the place to go if you’re interested in coastal and maritime history going back to the Revolutionary War (which is the reason South Carolina became the Palmetto State). Patriot’s Point: military history from a naval and maritime perspective. Tour the USS Yorktown Aircraft Carrier, the USS Laffey Destroyer, the USS Clamagore Submarine, the Vietnam Experience exhibit, and soon The Medal of Honor Museum. Fort Sumter: famous and infamous for its role in the Civil War. One of the best parts about visiting Fort Sumter is that you get to take a boat ride in the harbor to get there. The tours start both from Patriot’s Point marina and from downtown at the Fort Sumter National Monument Visitors Center and Ferry Slip. (The Visitors Center is next to The South Carolina Aquarium.) The South Carolina Aquarium: the name speaks for itself. In addition to the aquarium experience, you can enjoy a section of Harbor Walk along the mouth of the Cooper River. (The aquarium is right next to the Fort Sumter Visitors Center.) The International African American Museum: located on the site where almost half of all African captives arrived in the U.S. – Gadsden’s Wharf – the museum is set to open in the Fall of 2022. It will explore the cultures and diverse journeys and achievements of Africans forcibly brought to America as well as tell the stories of their descendants in South Carolina. The museum will also feature a Gullah Geechee exhibition gallery. The Cooper River Bridge: if you’re looking for some exercise and the highest view around, this is it. You’ll find plenty of parking under the bridge at Mount Pleasant Memorial Waterfront Park, just a couple of miles from here. (The park also has a long pier and is a nice picnic spot.) A wide sidewalk leads to the pedestrian lane that goes up the bridge. It’s about five miles over and back, but unless you’re really trying to get your exercise, just walk to the top of the span and enjoy the incredible views at the lookout area. (Be aware that there is a pedestrian lane and a bike lane, so check behind you before stepping across the yellow line, especially on the way down. Bicycle-versus-pedestrian collisions have happened.) Awendaw Green: if you happen to be in town on a Wednesday night and you’re a music lover, consider taking a little drive out to the country for a barn jam music celebration under the stars. Many local acts play here, as do traveling bands as they arrive in town to play weekend shows at other venues. Check out the Awendaw Green website to learn more about the music and the location, and if you go, know that you’ll experience a true local favorite. As their home page says, it’s “a laid-back venue in a laid-back town.” Downtown Charleston: there’s just too much to love about Downtown, so you’ll have to settle in and do some research, talk to us in person, or just go there and start walking. North of Broad Street are enough shops, restaurants, and streets to keep you busy for days. You’ll find yourself walking past and through historical churches, cemeteries, parks, and the oldest college in South Carolina, the College of Charleston (which is also the oldest municipal college in the U.S.) If you’re into history and architecture, you won’t find any better location than South of Broad. We suggest a long meandering walk, or consider renting beach cruisers to cover more ground, but settle in and go slow. Small alleys and residential gardens are easy to miss. When the day winds down, you might want to see a play at the historic Dock Street Theatre or catch a concert at the intimate Charleston City Music Hall. That’s just scratching the surface, so go ahead and plan your return trip!
170 íbúar mæla með
Charleston
170 íbúar mæla með
To see and do Pitt Street Bridge: a beautiful spot to catch sunrise or sunset, the Pitt Street Bridge is a long strip of causeway that runs across the marsh from the Old VIllage toward Sullivans Island, ending just before the Intercoastal Waterway and offering amazing views of Charleston Harbor (especially for that sunset). It’s the perfect place for a stroll, or If you’re a runner, try it as an out-and-back destination. (From here, it’s something in the range of a 30 minute run to the end of Pitt Street Bridge and back.) Alhambra Hall: if you want to see a beautiful sunset without leaving the neighborhood, and you love dogs, try Alhambra. It’s a four minute drive or less than a 20 minute walk. Farmer's Markets: During the spring and summer months both Charleston and Mt Pleasant host a farmer's market. Charleston's takes place on Saturdays at Marion Square and Mt Pleasant's takes place on Tuesday afternoon/early evening at Moultrie Middle School outdoor pavilion (walking distance from here.) The nearby beaches: Sullivans Island is closer (about 2.5 miles); Isle of Palms has bigger waves. Both can have parking challenges on busy summer days, but both are worth it if you’re looking for a wonderful beach day. Please pay attention to what is allowed and not allowed on the signs leading to the beach; we have seen people get ticketed. Folly Beach is located past James Island and is a bit of a drive, but the waves are bigger there if you're interested in surfing, and the laid back beach bars and restaurants are worth checking out. (Good to know: on perfect-weather days during the beach season, expect traffic going to any of these beaches.) Shem Creek Boardwalk: as the name implies, this walk goes right along Shem Creek, and on any given day, you’ll see a variety of local birds and local boaters. Dolphin frequent the creek, too. Go there for a stroll, the sunset, or some exercise, but know that you can always stop for a creekside beverage or meal at any number of spots. Fort Moultrie: history is everywhere when you are in the Charleston area, and Fort Moultrie, located on Sullivans Island, is the place to go if you’re interested in coastal and maritime history going back to the Revolutionary War (which is the reason South Carolina became the Palmetto State). Patriot’s Point: military history from a naval and maritime perspective. Tour the USS Yorktown Aircraft Carrier, the USS Laffey Destroyer, the USS Clamagore Submarine, the Vietnam Experience exhibit, and soon The Medal of Honor Museum. Fort Sumter: famous and infamous for its role in the Civil War. One of the best parts about visiting Fort Sumter is that you get to take a boat ride in the harbor to get there. The tours start both from Patriot’s Point marina and from downtown at the Fort Sumter National Monument Visitors Center and Ferry Slip. (The Visitors Center is next to The South Carolina Aquarium.) The South Carolina Aquarium: the name speaks for itself. In addition to the aquarium experience, you can enjoy a section of Harbor Walk along the mouth of the Cooper River. (The aquarium is right next to the Fort Sumter Visitors Center.) The International African American Museum: located on the site where almost half of all African captives arrived in the U.S. – Gadsden’s Wharf – the museum is set to open in the Fall of 2022. It will explore the cultures and diverse journeys and achievements of Africans forcibly brought to America as well as tell the stories of their descendants in South Carolina. The museum will also feature a Gullah Geechee exhibition gallery. The Cooper River Bridge: if you’re looking for some exercise and the highest view around, this is it. You’ll find plenty of parking under the bridge at Mount Pleasant Memorial Waterfront Park, just a couple of miles from here. (The park also has a long pier and is a nice picnic spot.) A wide sidewalk leads to the pedestrian lane that goes up the bridge. It’s about five miles over and back, but unless you’re really trying to get your exercise, just walk to the top of the span and enjoy the incredible views at the lookout area. (Be aware that there is a pedestrian lane and a bike lane, so check behind you before stepping across the yellow line, especially on the way down. Bicycle-versus-pedestrian collisions have happened.) Awendaw Green: if you happen to be in town on a Wednesday night and you’re a music lover, consider taking a little drive out to the country for a barn jam music celebration under the stars. Many local acts play here, as do traveling bands as they arrive in town to play weekend shows at other venues. Check out the Awendaw Green website to learn more about the music and the location, and if you go, know that you’ll experience a true local favorite. As their home page says, it’s “a laid-back venue in a laid-back town.” Downtown Charleston: there’s just too much to love about Downtown, so you’ll have to settle in and do some research, talk to us in person, or just go there and start walking. North of Broad Street are enough shops, restaurants, and streets to keep you busy for days. You’ll find yourself walking past and through historical churches, cemeteries, parks, and the oldest college in South Carolina, the College of Charleston (which is also the oldest municipal college in the U.S.) If you’re into history and architecture, you won’t find any better location than South of Broad. We suggest a long meandering walk, or consider renting beach cruisers to cover more ground, but settle in and go slow. Small alleys and residential gardens are easy to miss. When the day winds down, you might want to see a play at the historic Dock Street Theatre or catch a concert at the intimate Charleston City Music Hall. That’s just scratching the surface, so go ahead and plan your return trip!