Jennie's Guidebook

Jennie

Jennie's Guidebook

Food Scene
Excellent food and a fantastic atmosphere, they often have live bands offering entertainment. One of my personal favourites in a beautiful little town benefitting from a beach nearby, well worth a visit. 10 miles north east from Jen's Den. 01239 820321
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The Golden Lion Hotel
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Excellent food and a fantastic atmosphere, they often have live bands offering entertainment. One of my personal favourites in a beautiful little town benefitting from a beach nearby, well worth a visit. 10 miles north east from Jen's Den. 01239 820321
Fantastic food in a quirky pub set in a picturesque location. Stunning sunsets and excellent coastal walks on the doorstep. Another favourite of mine, never been disappointed here. The 2 mile coast path walk to Abereiddy's Blue Lagoon offers stunning views before a rewarding feast at the Sloop. 10 miles west from Jen's Den. 01348 831449
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Sloop Inn
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Fantastic food in a quirky pub set in a picturesque location. Stunning sunsets and excellent coastal walks on the doorstep. Another favourite of mine, never been disappointed here. The 2 mile coast path walk to Abereiddy's Blue Lagoon offers stunning views before a rewarding feast at the Sloop. 10 miles west from Jen's Den. 01348 831449
Good food and excellent cocktails in a lovely setting. 5 miles north from Jen's Den. 01348 873155
Rose & Crown
Good food and excellent cocktails in a lovely setting. 5 miles north from Jen's Den. 01348 873155
Gorgeous country hotel serving excellent food and cocktails. Beautiful gardens. 2 miles south from Jen's Den. 01437 741225
Allt Yr Afon Restaurant
Gorgeous country hotel serving excellent food and cocktails. Beautiful gardens. 2 miles south from Jen's Den. 01437 741225
Award winning takeaway chippy. 1 mile south from Jen's Den. 01348 840621
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Something's Cooking
3 Haverfordwest Rd
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Award winning takeaway chippy. 1 mile south from Jen's Den. 01348 840621
Quality pub grub in the heart of Fishguard. 5 miles north from Jen's Den. 01348 218632
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Royal Oak
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Quality pub grub in the heart of Fishguard. 5 miles north from Jen's Den. 01348 218632
Riverside pub serving quality food in the market town of Haverfordwest. 11 miles south from Jen's Den. 01437 762122
The Bristol Trader
Riverside pub serving quality food in the market town of Haverfordwest. 11 miles south from Jen's Den. 01437 762122
Good food, lovely beer garden with great views of Carew Castle. 25 miles south east from Jen's Den. 01646 651267
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Carew Inn
1 Picton Terrace
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Good food, lovely beer garden with great views of Carew Castle. 25 miles south east from Jen's Den. 01646 651267
Stunning country house in a beautiful location. 11 miles west from Jen's Den. 01348 831302
Crug Glas Country House
Stunning country house in a beautiful location. 11 miles west from Jen's Den. 01348 831302
My personal favourite Chinese takeaway in Fishguard but they sadly don't deliver. 5 miles north from Jen's Den. 01348 872004
Dragon House
26 Hamilton St
My personal favourite Chinese takeaway in Fishguard but they sadly don't deliver. 5 miles north from Jen's Den. 01348 872004
If you're over this side of the county and like a quality sit down Chinese meal this place definitely will not disappoint. The staff are fabulous and enhance the whole experience. 26 miles south from Jen's Den. 01834 812483
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The Dragon Palace
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If you're over this side of the county and like a quality sit down Chinese meal this place definitely will not disappoint. The staff are fabulous and enhance the whole experience. 26 miles south from Jen's Den. 01834 812483
Great quality seafood right in Milford Marina, with excellent views of the Cleddau Estuary. 19 miles south west from Jen's Den. 01646 695493
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The Harbourmaster
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Great quality seafood right in Milford Marina, with excellent views of the Cleddau Estuary. 19 miles south west from Jen's Den. 01646 695493
Decent food in a lovely country pub. 7 miles south east from Jen's Den. 01437 741881
The Pump on the Green Ltd
Decent food in a lovely country pub. 7 miles south east from Jen's Den. 01437 741881
Super quirky restaurant serving fabulous meals. Also benefits from a shop selling unique items and gifts. It's worth checking their opening hours and booking beforehand. 12 miles south from Jen's Den. 01437 766683
The George's
24 Market St
Super quirky restaurant serving fabulous meals. Also benefits from a shop selling unique items and gifts. It's worth checking their opening hours and booking beforehand. 12 miles south from Jen's Den. 01437 766683
Cafe and shop on the Pembrokeshire Coast between Newgale and Solva serving the most delicious ice cream, home made on site from the cows on the farm straight to your cone. A huge variety of too-tasty ice creams to enjoy in the indoor or covered outdoor seating areas. Well worth a visit, and I personally recommend the Ferrero Rocher 🤤
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Pointz Castle Ice Cream
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Cafe and shop on the Pembrokeshire Coast between Newgale and Solva serving the most delicious ice cream, home made on site from the cows on the farm straight to your cone. A huge variety of too-tasty ice creams to enjoy in the indoor or covered outdoor seating areas. Well worth a visit, and I personally recommend the Ferrero Rocher 🤤
Sightseeing
Recently benefitting from a 4 million pounds refurbishment, Llys Y Fran Lake is now well worth a visit to enjoy its Visitor Centre, café, new cycle hub, mountain biking, pump skills area, walking trails, water and land activities, fishing and adventure playground. A beautifully picturesque trail leads you right around the lake (approximately 9 miles) on foot or on a bike, with optional trails leading off for the intrepid mountain bikers.
Llys y Frân Country Park & Reservoir
Recently benefitting from a 4 million pounds refurbishment, Llys Y Fran Lake is now well worth a visit to enjoy its Visitor Centre, café, new cycle hub, mountain biking, pump skills area, walking trails, water and land activities, fishing and adventure playground. A beautifully picturesque trail leads you right around the lake (approximately 9 miles) on foot or on a bike, with optional trails leading off for the intrepid mountain bikers.
The Preseli Hills or, as they are known locally and historically, Preseli Mountains is a range of hills in north Pembrokeshire, west Wales, mostly within the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park. The range stretches from the proximity of Newport in the west to Crymych in the east, some 13 miles in extent. Stunning scenery and spectacular views, The Preselis have a diverse ecosystem, many prehistoric sites, and are a popular tourist destination. There are scattered settlements and small villages; the uplands provide extensive unenclosed grazing, and the lower slopes are mainly enclosed pasture. Slate quarrying was once an important industry. More recently, igneous rock is being extracted. The Preselis have Special Area of Conservation status, and there are three sites of special scientific interest (SSSIs). Approximately 12 miles from Jen's Den.
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Preseli Hills
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The Preseli Hills or, as they are known locally and historically, Preseli Mountains is a range of hills in north Pembrokeshire, west Wales, mostly within the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park. The range stretches from the proximity of Newport in the west to Crymych in the east, some 13 miles in extent. Stunning scenery and spectacular views, The Preselis have a diverse ecosystem, many prehistoric sites, and are a popular tourist destination. There are scattered settlements and small villages; the uplands provide extensive unenclosed grazing, and the lower slopes are mainly enclosed pasture. Slate quarrying was once an important industry. More recently, igneous rock is being extracted. The Preselis have Special Area of Conservation status, and there are three sites of special scientific interest (SSSIs). Approximately 12 miles from Jen's Den.
NEWPORT SANDS, NEWPORT PEMBROKESHIRE. Also known as Traeth Mawr or Big Beach. This is the largest of the beaches at Newport with almost a mile of flat sand stretching across the bay below Newport Sands Golf Course. During the summer there is a safe swimming zone manned by lifeguards from the Newport Sands Lifesaving Club. There is ample space along the beach for all sorts of water based activities including sailing, canoeing, kayaking and more. Adventurous canoe/kayakers can find some great little secluded beaches along the cliffs that flank both sides of the bay. Fun in the sand dunes at Newport Sands Walkers can delight in the cliff top views that can be found on the Pembrokeshire Coastal Path from Newport Sands, the cliff path can be found at the sea end of the right hand car park (if you were facing the sea) and continues on to Poppit Sands near St Dogmaels. For the less adventurous walkers, a short walk along the cliff path brings you down in to a small valley with a waterfall. This can also be found by walking along the beach during low tide, be sure to check on the tides (plus 1 hour for Newport tides) before visiting the waterfall along the beach route as you could become cut off by the rising tide. The quieter estuary side to Newport Sands Occasionally when the tides are extremely low, the remains of a petrified forest can be found at the sea edge, presumably once connected to the woodlands you can see in the distance when looking up the valley floor eastwards where the Nevern Estuary meanders its way down to meet the sea. There is a small shop in one of the car parks that sells Ice cream, lollypops pops, hot and cold drinks etc.. The beach is popular with locals and tourists alike and has ample parking space in two car parks. A parking fee is charged. Sunset at Newport Sands During the Winter months, Newport Sands can be a spectacle worth every wind blasted visitors delight. Pick a mottled cloudy day when the sun is low in the sky and the beach transforms with light casting rays across the mirror like wet sand. Traeth Mawr is popular at this time of the year with kite surfers, land yachters and wind surfers - providing hours of entertainment watching them go about their business in the howling South Westerly's. Wildlife to look out for: Swans, common egrets, gulls, oyster catchers Salmon, sewin, mullet, trout, flat fish, mackerel, pollack, dog fish Porpoises, dolphins, seals, baskin sharks Newport Sands Amenities: Car Parks Toilets Ice Cream Shop Surf Club Safe Swimming Zone Pembrokeshire Coastal Path Access Accommodation near Newport Sands: Holiday Cottages Newport Bed and Breakfasts Camping and Caravans Directions: On foot, you can cross the river at low tide at The Parrog or walk part of The Pembrokeshire Coastal Path along the north side of The Nevern Estuary. To get to Traeth Mawr by car, follow signs for Feidr Pen-Y-Bont from the main A487 just before you exit Newport heading east. Follow this road over the Iron Bridge and a mile or so later take the next left turn and follow this road down past Newport Golf Club, it will bring you down to the car parks at Newport Sands. Newport sands is approximately 13 miles north east from Jen's Den.
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Newport Beach
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NEWPORT SANDS, NEWPORT PEMBROKESHIRE. Also known as Traeth Mawr or Big Beach. This is the largest of the beaches at Newport with almost a mile of flat sand stretching across the bay below Newport Sands Golf Course. During the summer there is a safe swimming zone manned by lifeguards from the Newport Sands Lifesaving Club. There is ample space along the beach for all sorts of water based activities including sailing, canoeing, kayaking and more. Adventurous canoe/kayakers can find some great little secluded beaches along the cliffs that flank both sides of the bay. Fun in the sand dunes at Newport Sands Walkers can delight in the cliff top views that can be found on the Pembrokeshire Coastal Path from Newport Sands, the cliff path can be found at the sea end of the right hand car park (if you were facing the sea) and continues on to Poppit Sands near St Dogmaels. For the less adventurous walkers, a short walk along the cliff path brings you down in to a small valley with a waterfall. This can also be found by walking along the beach during low tide, be sure to check on the tides (plus 1 hour for Newport tides) before visiting the waterfall along the beach route as you could become cut off by the rising tide. The quieter estuary side to Newport Sands Occasionally when the tides are extremely low, the remains of a petrified forest can be found at the sea edge, presumably once connected to the woodlands you can see in the distance when looking up the valley floor eastwards where the Nevern Estuary meanders its way down to meet the sea. There is a small shop in one of the car parks that sells Ice cream, lollypops pops, hot and cold drinks etc.. The beach is popular with locals and tourists alike and has ample parking space in two car parks. A parking fee is charged. Sunset at Newport Sands During the Winter months, Newport Sands can be a spectacle worth every wind blasted visitors delight. Pick a mottled cloudy day when the sun is low in the sky and the beach transforms with light casting rays across the mirror like wet sand. Traeth Mawr is popular at this time of the year with kite surfers, land yachters and wind surfers - providing hours of entertainment watching them go about their business in the howling South Westerly's. Wildlife to look out for: Swans, common egrets, gulls, oyster catchers Salmon, sewin, mullet, trout, flat fish, mackerel, pollack, dog fish Porpoises, dolphins, seals, baskin sharks Newport Sands Amenities: Car Parks Toilets Ice Cream Shop Surf Club Safe Swimming Zone Pembrokeshire Coastal Path Access Accommodation near Newport Sands: Holiday Cottages Newport Bed and Breakfasts Camping and Caravans Directions: On foot, you can cross the river at low tide at The Parrog or walk part of The Pembrokeshire Coastal Path along the north side of The Nevern Estuary. To get to Traeth Mawr by car, follow signs for Feidr Pen-Y-Bont from the main A487 just before you exit Newport heading east. Follow this road over the Iron Bridge and a mile or so later take the next left turn and follow this road down past Newport Golf Club, it will bring you down to the car parks at Newport Sands. Newport sands is approximately 13 miles north east from Jen's Den.
PEMBROKESHIRE COAST PATH NATIONAL TRAIL The Pembrokeshire Coast Path is a spectacular 186 mile (299 km) long National Trail covering some of the most varied coastal scenery in Britain, stretching from St Dogmaels in the north to Amroth in the south. Both the Wales Coast Path and the International Appalachian Trail follow the route of the Pembrokeshire Coast Path through Pembrokeshire. Along the Path you can see many reminders of this maritime tradition from the Neolithic cromlechs and Iron Age promontory forts to the churches and chapels of the seafaring early Celtic saints and their followers. The Vikings took interest in the area, reflected today in a legacy of place names such as Goodwick near Fishguard and the islands of Skomer and Skokholm. The Normans built massive castles, such as those at Pembroke, Tenby and Manorbier, to assert their authority. Today these castles are reminders that, despite its peripheral geographical position, Pembrokeshire once played a key role in major events. The Pembrokeshire Coast Path winds its way across a variety of landscapes, from high cliff tops and secret coves to sweeping estuaries and wide sandy beaches. The highest point is at Pen yr Afr near Ceibwr Bay, where the sea-sprayed cliffs reach 1,500 feet. This northern stretch of the Path from St Dogmael’s to St David’s Head is the wildest and most remote section, with the occasional coastal community, such as those at Newport, Fishguard and Porthgain, adding to the charm. On the western-facing edge, Atlantic breakers crash onto the wide beaches of Newgale and Broad Haven in the curve of St Bride’s Bay. From this section of the Path the sky is big and there are often spectacular views to the bird-encircled islands of Ramsey and Skomer. The Path along the Milford Haven estuary offers huge contrasts from the wild seascape at St Anne’s Head, through the industrial hub around Milford Haven to the calmer waters of the upper reaches of the waterway. This famous natural harbour is a ria – a drowned river valley formed as a result of rising sea levels at the end of the last Ice Age. The southern section is the most used as it is closest to the popular holiday resorts of Tenby and Saundersfoot. But even along this south-facing rim there are miles of secluded cliff walks and sheltered beaches. Check out the lily ponds at Bosherston and the golden sands of Barafundle – frequently voted one of the best beaches in the world. Inland from wherever you are along the Path you will see flat and gently undulating farmland. It may be just a step away from the coast but this agricultural countryside also has its own unique habitats and ecosystems giving walkers the best of both worlds.
Pembrokeshire Coast Path
PEMBROKESHIRE COAST PATH NATIONAL TRAIL The Pembrokeshire Coast Path is a spectacular 186 mile (299 km) long National Trail covering some of the most varied coastal scenery in Britain, stretching from St Dogmaels in the north to Amroth in the south. Both the Wales Coast Path and the International Appalachian Trail follow the route of the Pembrokeshire Coast Path through Pembrokeshire. Along the Path you can see many reminders of this maritime tradition from the Neolithic cromlechs and Iron Age promontory forts to the churches and chapels of the seafaring early Celtic saints and their followers. The Vikings took interest in the area, reflected today in a legacy of place names such as Goodwick near Fishguard and the islands of Skomer and Skokholm. The Normans built massive castles, such as those at Pembroke, Tenby and Manorbier, to assert their authority. Today these castles are reminders that, despite its peripheral geographical position, Pembrokeshire once played a key role in major events. The Pembrokeshire Coast Path winds its way across a variety of landscapes, from high cliff tops and secret coves to sweeping estuaries and wide sandy beaches. The highest point is at Pen yr Afr near Ceibwr Bay, where the sea-sprayed cliffs reach 1,500 feet. This northern stretch of the Path from St Dogmael’s to St David’s Head is the wildest and most remote section, with the occasional coastal community, such as those at Newport, Fishguard and Porthgain, adding to the charm. On the western-facing edge, Atlantic breakers crash onto the wide beaches of Newgale and Broad Haven in the curve of St Bride’s Bay. From this section of the Path the sky is big and there are often spectacular views to the bird-encircled islands of Ramsey and Skomer. The Path along the Milford Haven estuary offers huge contrasts from the wild seascape at St Anne’s Head, through the industrial hub around Milford Haven to the calmer waters of the upper reaches of the waterway. This famous natural harbour is a ria – a drowned river valley formed as a result of rising sea levels at the end of the last Ice Age. The southern section is the most used as it is closest to the popular holiday resorts of Tenby and Saundersfoot. But even along this south-facing rim there are miles of secluded cliff walks and sheltered beaches. Check out the lily ponds at Bosherston and the golden sands of Barafundle – frequently voted one of the best beaches in the world. Inland from wherever you are along the Path you will see flat and gently undulating farmland. It may be just a step away from the coast but this agricultural countryside also has its own unique habitats and ecosystems giving walkers the best of both worlds.
Since the 6th century there has been a church on this site. For the past 1500 years prayer and worship has been offered to God on a daily basis which continues to this day.
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St David's Cathedral
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Since the 6th century there has been a church on this site. For the past 1500 years prayer and worship has been offered to God on a daily basis which continues to this day.
Porthgain is a small coastal hamlet on the north coast of St Davids Peninsula. Once a small commercial harbour used for exporting stone from the nearby quarry, Porthgain is now a very popular tourist centre thanks to a great pub, a super cafe restaurant and excellent art galleries. Add to this the superb location in the heart of the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park and Porthgain has a winning combination.
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Porthgain Harbour
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Porthgain is a small coastal hamlet on the north coast of St Davids Peninsula. Once a small commercial harbour used for exporting stone from the nearby quarry, Porthgain is now a very popular tourist centre thanks to a great pub, a super cafe restaurant and excellent art galleries. Add to this the superb location in the heart of the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park and Porthgain has a winning combination.
Pebbles and extraordinarily dark sand made of pounded grey slate form this rural beach. The same slate gives a brilliant deep blue colour to the water in the ‘Blue Lagoon’; a beautiful little harbour – a breached quarry – just to the north of the beach which is accessible for wheelchair and scooter users. Be aware Abereiddy beach has strong currents. This is a popular spot for coasteering, climbing along the cliffs at sea level, leaping into the sea if you reach an impassable bit. Please enjoy coasteering as part of an organised group. Alongside the old quarry are a row of ruined cottages to explore.
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Abereiddy Beach
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Pebbles and extraordinarily dark sand made of pounded grey slate form this rural beach. The same slate gives a brilliant deep blue colour to the water in the ‘Blue Lagoon’; a beautiful little harbour – a breached quarry – just to the north of the beach which is accessible for wheelchair and scooter users. Be aware Abereiddy beach has strong currents. This is a popular spot for coasteering, climbing along the cliffs at sea level, leaping into the sea if you reach an impassable bit. Please enjoy coasteering as part of an organised group. Alongside the old quarry are a row of ruined cottages to explore.
Cardigan has everything: ancient history, modern comforts, beautiful landscapes, and the sea just in reach. Its spirit is part old-fashioned Welsh market town, part hippy, arty enclave.
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Cardigan Bay
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Cardigan has everything: ancient history, modern comforts, beautiful landscapes, and the sea just in reach. Its spirit is part old-fashioned Welsh market town, part hippy, arty enclave.
Enormous! is the only way to describe this beach; it’s almost 2 miles of sand backed by a huge pebble bank formed after a BIG storm in 1859. Kitesurfing and surfing are popular on this beach and tuition is available. Walk right down to the southern end to find a walk-through cave and numerous sheltered bays. Cross the river, at the back of the pebble bank opposite the cafe at the north end to gain access to several low tide bays. At very low tide it’s possible to walk round to Cwm Mawr beach but keep an eye on the tide times as you don’t want to get cut off. The Duke of Edinburgh pub offers good food and a decent pint, plus there is a shop and a cafe also within a stone's throw of the beach.
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Newgale Beach
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Enormous! is the only way to describe this beach; it’s almost 2 miles of sand backed by a huge pebble bank formed after a BIG storm in 1859. Kitesurfing and surfing are popular on this beach and tuition is available. Walk right down to the southern end to find a walk-through cave and numerous sheltered bays. Cross the river, at the back of the pebble bank opposite the cafe at the north end to gain access to several low tide bays. At very low tide it’s possible to walk round to Cwm Mawr beach but keep an eye on the tide times as you don’t want to get cut off. The Duke of Edinburgh pub offers good food and a decent pint, plus there is a shop and a cafe also within a stone's throw of the beach.
Whitesands beach Overlooked by the imposing craggy hill of Carn Llidi, this wide expanse of fine white sand curves north towards the remote rocky headland of St Davids Head. This is one of the best surfing beaches in the country and therefore very popular. The surf ‘break’ is at the northern end and on busy days there are canoeists, surfers, and bodyboarders competing for the best waves. At this end, there’s a rocky promontory to climb on. At the quieter south end, there are some nicely sheltered bays.
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Whitesands Bay
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Whitesands beach Overlooked by the imposing craggy hill of Carn Llidi, this wide expanse of fine white sand curves north towards the remote rocky headland of St Davids Head. This is one of the best surfing beaches in the country and therefore very popular. The surf ‘break’ is at the northern end and on busy days there are canoeists, surfers, and bodyboarders competing for the best waves. At this end, there’s a rocky promontory to climb on. At the quieter south end, there are some nicely sheltered bays.
The Treffgarne Rocks Circular Walk starts from by the Nant-y-Coy Mill just off the A40 between Treffgarne and Wolf’s Castle. From Nant-y-Coy mill, take the small lane that leads sharply uphill to its south. Continue up around the bend until you reach a small parking area (an alternative parking place if you want to cut off the first hill and don’t mind driving up steep narrow lanes). Opposite this the footpath leaves the lane on the left. It is marked with a sign. Follow this path. A short way on and the path splits. Take the right hand fork and start heading uphill on a narrow path through the bracken. This stretch can be a little bit challenging after wet weather (you will need shoes with grip that can also cope with a bit of mud) but it isn’t long. At the top the bracken emerges onto open hillside. The going is easy from here. Walk through the gate and head for Maiden Castle – the big outcrop of the rocks right ahead. These dramatic looking rocks also go by the name of The Lion  – a good name as you will see when you walk on and look back at it – it is a perfect silhouette of a giant stone lion lying down, surveying the whole of the landscape around it. The views from the hillside here are lovely. From Maiden’s Castle you can see your next walk stop-off – the even bigger rocky outcrop of Poll Carn which is unmissable on the southern side of the rocks. Rejoin the path at the base of Maiden’s Castle as it follows flatly through the bracken to another gate. Just beyond here the path joins a wider farm track. The gateway into the field by Poll Carn is to your right. There is a footpath that leads in a loop around this field and the base of Poll Carn’s rocks which makes a nice little extra circular walk. The rocks are close enough at least to appreciate their drama from a short distance and although not as oddly shaped as those of Maiden’s Castle, they are equally dramatic with the watchful ravens perched on their peaks only adding to the mystical atmosphere. Poll Carn also has its local nicknames – it goes by titles such as ‘the teddybear’, ‘the unicorn’ and ‘wolf’s rock’. Back on the main track and with Poll Carn to your right, walk downhill. Technically the footpath meanders off on the grass to oneside but it isn’t marked or obvious and the farm track is much easier to follow. At the bottom of the hill you reach a crossroads. A track leading back to Treffgarne and its church lies to the right (an alternative starting point), another gate lies ahead and the path back heads across the grass to the left, following the waypoint. Continue across the grass and through a small gate. Continue down a grassy path lined with hedgerow, enjoying great views back up to Maiden’s Castle on your left. Eventually you come to another small intersection of paths. The return walk leads on the pathstraight ahead. If it is not overgrown then there is a small path to the right hand side here also which leads onto the iron age hill settlement at Great Treffgarne Rocks. The view is said to be really good down onto the gorge from here. Back on the main path continue straight on and back onto a narrow path leading downhill through the bracken. This path brings you back to the fork in the path at the start of the walk. Keep right and you will emerge onto the lane opposite the parking area. If you have time, I can highly recommend the reasonably priced lunch menu at nearby Wolf’s Castle Hotel. The food is superb and they offer both light bites and a fantastic set menu. Directions: The Treffgarne Rocks Circular Walk is easily accessed from the A40 between Haverfordwest and Fishguard. Free parking is available in the lay-by by Nant-y-Coy Mill, which is found between the villages of Treffgarne and Wolf’s Castle. Alternatively if you want to avoid the first bit of uphill walking, drive up the small lane immediately to the south of the mill. This leads up to a small parking area opposite the footpath that marks the start of the Treffgarne Rocks Circular Walk. There are regular bus services that run along the A40 but from some brief research, none of these seem to stop at the layby by Nant-y-Coy Mill. The road is fast and narrow here so unless stopping by the mill is possible (and do double check) then I wouldn’t recommend trying to walk from Treffgarne or Wolf’s Castle. Instead you could start the walk from Treffgarne village and join it along the farm track that leads back from the chuch – it’s easy to find if you have an OS Map and joins the Treffgarne Rocks Circular Walk at the cross-roads.
Treffgarne
The Treffgarne Rocks Circular Walk starts from by the Nant-y-Coy Mill just off the A40 between Treffgarne and Wolf’s Castle. From Nant-y-Coy mill, take the small lane that leads sharply uphill to its south. Continue up around the bend until you reach a small parking area (an alternative parking place if you want to cut off the first hill and don’t mind driving up steep narrow lanes). Opposite this the footpath leaves the lane on the left. It is marked with a sign. Follow this path. A short way on and the path splits. Take the right hand fork and start heading uphill on a narrow path through the bracken. This stretch can be a little bit challenging after wet weather (you will need shoes with grip that can also cope with a bit of mud) but it isn’t long. At the top the bracken emerges onto open hillside. The going is easy from here. Walk through the gate and head for Maiden Castle – the big outcrop of the rocks right ahead. These dramatic looking rocks also go by the name of The Lion  – a good name as you will see when you walk on and look back at it – it is a perfect silhouette of a giant stone lion lying down, surveying the whole of the landscape around it. The views from the hillside here are lovely. From Maiden’s Castle you can see your next walk stop-off – the even bigger rocky outcrop of Poll Carn which is unmissable on the southern side of the rocks. Rejoin the path at the base of Maiden’s Castle as it follows flatly through the bracken to another gate. Just beyond here the path joins a wider farm track. The gateway into the field by Poll Carn is to your right. There is a footpath that leads in a loop around this field and the base of Poll Carn’s rocks which makes a nice little extra circular walk. The rocks are close enough at least to appreciate their drama from a short distance and although not as oddly shaped as those of Maiden’s Castle, they are equally dramatic with the watchful ravens perched on their peaks only adding to the mystical atmosphere. Poll Carn also has its local nicknames – it goes by titles such as ‘the teddybear’, ‘the unicorn’ and ‘wolf’s rock’. Back on the main track and with Poll Carn to your right, walk downhill. Technically the footpath meanders off on the grass to oneside but it isn’t marked or obvious and the farm track is much easier to follow. At the bottom of the hill you reach a crossroads. A track leading back to Treffgarne and its church lies to the right (an alternative starting point), another gate lies ahead and the path back heads across the grass to the left, following the waypoint. Continue across the grass and through a small gate. Continue down a grassy path lined with hedgerow, enjoying great views back up to Maiden’s Castle on your left. Eventually you come to another small intersection of paths. The return walk leads on the pathstraight ahead. If it is not overgrown then there is a small path to the right hand side here also which leads onto the iron age hill settlement at Great Treffgarne Rocks. The view is said to be really good down onto the gorge from here. Back on the main path continue straight on and back onto a narrow path leading downhill through the bracken. This path brings you back to the fork in the path at the start of the walk. Keep right and you will emerge onto the lane opposite the parking area. If you have time, I can highly recommend the reasonably priced lunch menu at nearby Wolf’s Castle Hotel. The food is superb and they offer both light bites and a fantastic set menu. Directions: The Treffgarne Rocks Circular Walk is easily accessed from the A40 between Haverfordwest and Fishguard. Free parking is available in the lay-by by Nant-y-Coy Mill, which is found between the villages of Treffgarne and Wolf’s Castle. Alternatively if you want to avoid the first bit of uphill walking, drive up the small lane immediately to the south of the mill. This leads up to a small parking area opposite the footpath that marks the start of the Treffgarne Rocks Circular Walk. There are regular bus services that run along the A40 but from some brief research, none of these seem to stop at the layby by Nant-y-Coy Mill. The road is fast and narrow here so unless stopping by the mill is possible (and do double check) then I wouldn’t recommend trying to walk from Treffgarne or Wolf’s Castle. Instead you could start the walk from Treffgarne village and join it along the farm track that leads back from the chuch – it’s easy to find if you have an OS Map and joins the Treffgarne Rocks Circular Walk at the cross-roads.
Things To Do
Fun and thrills for all the family at Wales’ biggest Theme Park. Whether it’s an adrenaline-fuelled experience or a magical adventure, Oakwood Theme Park has thrills for all. Based in the heart of Pembrokeshire, South Wales, Oakwood boasts fun for the whole family – toddler friendly rides, fast thrills and spills, including the UK’s favourite wooden roller coaster – Megafobia. Canaston Bridge Narberth Pembrokeshire SA678DE 01834 815170 20 miles south east from Jen's Den. Tickets must be booked online. https://www.google.co.uk/maps/place/Oakwood+Theme+Park/@51.776045,-4.796991,15z/data=!4m12!1m6!3m5!1s0x0:0x3b7617f6eb581985!2sOakwood+Theme+Park!8m2!3d51.7796236!4d-4.8045337!3m4!1s0x0:0x3b7617f6eb581985!8m2!3d51.7796236!4d-4.8045337?hl=en
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Oakwood Theme Park
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Fun and thrills for all the family at Wales’ biggest Theme Park. Whether it’s an adrenaline-fuelled experience or a magical adventure, Oakwood Theme Park has thrills for all. Based in the heart of Pembrokeshire, South Wales, Oakwood boasts fun for the whole family – toddler friendly rides, fast thrills and spills, including the UK’s favourite wooden roller coaster – Megafobia. Canaston Bridge Narberth Pembrokeshire SA678DE 01834 815170 20 miles south east from Jen's Den. Tickets must be booked online. https://www.google.co.uk/maps/place/Oakwood+Theme+Park/@51.776045,-4.796991,15z/data=!4m12!1m6!3m5!1s0x0:0x3b7617f6eb581985!2sOakwood+Theme+Park!8m2!3d51.7796236!4d-4.8045337!3m4!1s0x0:0x3b7617f6eb581985!8m2!3d51.7796236!4d-4.8045337?hl=en
You can visit over 750 animals at the zoo, and get up close to furry and feathery farmyard friends in the barn. Choose from 17 different rides in the vintage fairground, or enjoy the eight adventure play areas. There are 120 acres of fun so there really is something for everyone! Begelly Kilgetty Pembrokeshire SA68 0XA 24 miles south east from Jen's Den.
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Folly Farm Adventure Park and Zoo
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You can visit over 750 animals at the zoo, and get up close to furry and feathery farmyard friends in the barn. Choose from 17 different rides in the vintage fairground, or enjoy the eight adventure play areas. There are 120 acres of fun so there really is something for everyone! Begelly Kilgetty Pembrokeshire SA68 0XA 24 miles south east from Jen's Den.
Enjoy a fantastic family day out at Heatherton World of Activities in beautiful Pembrokeshire, just 3 miles from Tenby in South West Wales. Discover a whole world of amazing indoor and outdoor activities for all ages, from family fun to adrenaline-pumping Pembrokeshire adventures...and they’re even dog friendly! Whether you love the thrill of speeding round a go kart track, the adrenaline rush of a high ropes trail, the mental challenge of Escape Rooms or the fun of an ENTIRE zone dedicated to play, they have it ALL and more at Heatherton! Heatherton World of Activities St Florence, Tenby Pembrokeshire SA70 8RJ info@heatherton.co.uk Booking online. 29 miles south east from Jen's Den.
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Heatherton Activity Park Ltd
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Enjoy a fantastic family day out at Heatherton World of Activities in beautiful Pembrokeshire, just 3 miles from Tenby in South West Wales. Discover a whole world of amazing indoor and outdoor activities for all ages, from family fun to adrenaline-pumping Pembrokeshire adventures...and they’re even dog friendly! Whether you love the thrill of speeding round a go kart track, the adrenaline rush of a high ropes trail, the mental challenge of Escape Rooms or the fun of an ENTIRE zone dedicated to play, they have it ALL and more at Heatherton! Heatherton World of Activities St Florence, Tenby Pembrokeshire SA70 8RJ info@heatherton.co.uk Booking online. 29 miles south east from Jen's Den.
Its mission is to protect and secure endangered species ecosystems. Ex-situ animals have been introduced to a natural Pembrokeshire landscape. Single and multi-species enclosures have been cleverly created with as few apparent boundaries as possible, to give visitors the impression of free roam while ensuring the safety of both human and non-human animals. Wanting visitors to connect with animals and their environments, connect with natural surroundings, connect with the environment and the serious challenges and threats facing the survival of the planet. They want people to make connections, and understand the inter-connectedness of flora, fauna and world climates or biomes. Manor Wildlife Park St. Florence Tenby SA70 8RJ Pembrokeshire 29 miles south east from Jen's Den.
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Manor House Wildlife Park
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Its mission is to protect and secure endangered species ecosystems. Ex-situ animals have been introduced to a natural Pembrokeshire landscape. Single and multi-species enclosures have been cleverly created with as few apparent boundaries as possible, to give visitors the impression of free roam while ensuring the safety of both human and non-human animals. Wanting visitors to connect with animals and their environments, connect with natural surroundings, connect with the environment and the serious challenges and threats facing the survival of the planet. They want people to make connections, and understand the inter-connectedness of flora, fauna and world climates or biomes. Manor Wildlife Park St. Florence Tenby SA70 8RJ Pembrokeshire 29 miles south east from Jen's Den.
Pembrokeshire's County Museum is located in a traditional Victorian country house near Haverfordwest, surrounded by 60 acres of park and woodland and is completed by an award-winning eco-centre. The Victorian Manor House, Stable Block and Exhibition Hall feature many displays illustrating the history of the County. The agricultural and rural life collection is one of the largest on display in Wales. But Scolton is much more than a visit to a bygone age. It is the place where Pembrokeshire’s past meets up with the future. The museum is complemented by the environment-friendly Visitor Centre where the displays focus on green issues and the wildlife of the park. This ‘Greener’ lifestyle can also be experienced in the landscaped grounds of the Country Park and on the Nature Trails through the surrounding woodland. The park also features picnic sites and play areas to suit all ages. The grounds at Scolton are open all year round and offer an ideal place for a casual walk.
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Scolton Manor
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Pembrokeshire's County Museum is located in a traditional Victorian country house near Haverfordwest, surrounded by 60 acres of park and woodland and is completed by an award-winning eco-centre. The Victorian Manor House, Stable Block and Exhibition Hall feature many displays illustrating the history of the County. The agricultural and rural life collection is one of the largest on display in Wales. But Scolton is much more than a visit to a bygone age. It is the place where Pembrokeshire’s past meets up with the future. The museum is complemented by the environment-friendly Visitor Centre where the displays focus on green issues and the wildlife of the park. This ‘Greener’ lifestyle can also be experienced in the landscaped grounds of the Country Park and on the Nature Trails through the surrounding woodland. The park also features picnic sites and play areas to suit all ages. The grounds at Scolton are open all year round and offer an ideal place for a casual walk.
Neighbourhoods
Letterston (Welsh: Treletert) is a parish and local government community in north Pembrokeshire, Wales. Situated on the A40, Haverfordwest is 10 miles (16 km) to the south and Fishguard is 7 miles (11 km) to the north.
Letterston
Letterston (Welsh: Treletert) is a parish and local government community in north Pembrokeshire, Wales. Situated on the A40, Haverfordwest is 10 miles (16 km) to the south and Fishguard is 7 miles (11 km) to the north.