Local beaches

Charles

Local beaches

My favourite beaches
Llangrannog is named after St Crannog, and since 2012, a bronze statue of him made by renowned Llangrannog-based sculptor Sebastien Boyesen looks out from the north-facing cliff on the west side of the bay. Carannog was thought to be the grandson of Ceredig, the 5th century Prince of Ceredigion. He was expected to follow his grandfather as ruler, but instead he came to the area that is now called Llangrannog, and established a religious community and settlement close to the site of the present church. From Llangrannog, Carannog travelled the Celtic world, establishing religious communities in Somerset, Cornwall, Brittany and Ireland. His Latin name was Carantec, and this is reflected in some of these settlements, such as Crantock, Carantec, and Trecarantec. The sculpture emphasises his role as a travelling missionary, roughly dressed, and carrying the tools of his trade. The sandy beach he overlooks is popular with families and surfers and is a great place to relax and watch for dolphins out at sea. There is a distinctive rock on the shore called ‘Carreg Bica’ which according to legend was once a giant’s tooth. At low tide, you can walk past this rock to the hidden sandy cove of Cilborth. The cliff path leads to the spectacular headland of Ynys Lochtyn with its hidden beach. In spring you might see Fulmar nesting on the cliffs and there is often the chance to spot Chough, Stonechat or Wheatear as well as other interesting coastal birds. Right at the end of this headland is a small island which is only accessible at low tide and involves scrambling up and down steep cliffs. Those who want a longer walk can join the spectacular Ceredigion Coast Path which follows a 60 mile route along the Cardigan Bay coastline with its characteristic splashes of dazzling yellow, almond-scented gorse. This plant blooms on and off all year but is at its best in late spring when it is joined by pink sea thrift, yellow vetch and white sea campion. Llangrannog has 2 excellent pubs, The Pentre Arms and The Ship, 2 cafes, The Patio Cafe, famous for its delicious homemade ice cream and The Beach Hut which also has a fish & chip shop, a small gift and grocery shop, recently opened local craft shop and public toilets. Llangrannog beach is a family friendly which has lifeguards over the summer months. As well as being ideal for all the usual beach activities and bathing, Llangrannog is popular for watersports including surfing, paddle boarding & kayaking. There is also a slipway in Llangrannog and due to the fresh winds in the area makes it ideal for sailing.
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Llangrannog
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Llangrannog is named after St Crannog, and since 2012, a bronze statue of him made by renowned Llangrannog-based sculptor Sebastien Boyesen looks out from the north-facing cliff on the west side of the bay. Carannog was thought to be the grandson of Ceredig, the 5th century Prince of Ceredigion. He was expected to follow his grandfather as ruler, but instead he came to the area that is now called Llangrannog, and established a religious community and settlement close to the site of the present church. From Llangrannog, Carannog travelled the Celtic world, establishing religious communities in Somerset, Cornwall, Brittany and Ireland. His Latin name was Carantec, and this is reflected in some of these settlements, such as Crantock, Carantec, and Trecarantec. The sculpture emphasises his role as a travelling missionary, roughly dressed, and carrying the tools of his trade. The sandy beach he overlooks is popular with families and surfers and is a great place to relax and watch for dolphins out at sea. There is a distinctive rock on the shore called ‘Carreg Bica’ which according to legend was once a giant’s tooth. At low tide, you can walk past this rock to the hidden sandy cove of Cilborth. The cliff path leads to the spectacular headland of Ynys Lochtyn with its hidden beach. In spring you might see Fulmar nesting on the cliffs and there is often the chance to spot Chough, Stonechat or Wheatear as well as other interesting coastal birds. Right at the end of this headland is a small island which is only accessible at low tide and involves scrambling up and down steep cliffs. Those who want a longer walk can join the spectacular Ceredigion Coast Path which follows a 60 mile route along the Cardigan Bay coastline with its characteristic splashes of dazzling yellow, almond-scented gorse. This plant blooms on and off all year but is at its best in late spring when it is joined by pink sea thrift, yellow vetch and white sea campion. Llangrannog has 2 excellent pubs, The Pentre Arms and The Ship, 2 cafes, The Patio Cafe, famous for its delicious homemade ice cream and The Beach Hut which also has a fish & chip shop, a small gift and grocery shop, recently opened local craft shop and public toilets. Llangrannog beach is a family friendly which has lifeguards over the summer months. As well as being ideal for all the usual beach activities and bathing, Llangrannog is popular for watersports including surfing, paddle boarding & kayaking. There is also a slipway in Llangrannog and due to the fresh winds in the area makes it ideal for sailing.
Poppit Sands is a very wide sandy beach at the estuary of the River Teifi near Cardigan in Wales. It is close to St Dogmaels and the northern end of the Pembrokeshire Coast Path starts there. The area is a gathering spot for surfers and kite flying. The seasonal Poppit Rocket bus calls at Poppit Sands. There is a lifeboat station at Poppit, and a large public car park with a cafe.
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Poppit Sands Beach
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Poppit Sands is a very wide sandy beach at the estuary of the River Teifi near Cardigan in Wales. It is close to St Dogmaels and the northern end of the Pembrokeshire Coast Path starts there. The area is a gathering spot for surfers and kite flying. The seasonal Poppit Rocket bus calls at Poppit Sands. There is a lifeboat station at Poppit, and a large public car park with a cafe.
See also the picture on the guide which is of Mwnt beach. Mwnt is a National Trust beach. There is a large pay and display car park above the beach and a shop and toilets partway down the path leading to the beach. The Cardi Bach bus service calls at Mwnt in the summer twice daily. The picturesque Church of the Holy Cross (Welsh: Eglwys y Grog) sits in the meadow above the beach.
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Traeth Mwnt
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See also the picture on the guide which is of Mwnt beach. Mwnt is a National Trust beach. There is a large pay and display car park above the beach and a shop and toilets partway down the path leading to the beach. The Cardi Bach bus service calls at Mwnt in the summer twice daily. The picturesque Church of the Holy Cross (Welsh: Eglwys y Grog) sits in the meadow above the beach.
There are two beaches at Aberporth with a small public car park on the rocky area between them. In the 16th century, Aberporth was a subsidiary landing point for the port of Cardigan. Boats, nets and salt for preserving were brought in from Ireland.
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Aberporth Beach
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There are two beaches at Aberporth with a small public car park on the rocky area between them. In the 16th century, Aberporth was a subsidiary landing point for the port of Cardigan. Boats, nets and salt for preserving were brought in from Ireland.
Tresaith is a wide sandy beach with a shop and a Restaurant close by. Part of the beach is pet friendly. There is limited public parking. The Cardi Bach bus service calls at Tresaith in the summer twice daily. Legend relates that seven princesses from Ireland landed here, fell in love with the sons of seven local Welsh families, married and settled down. This is why the settlement is called Tresaith (Welsh 'the Town of Seven').
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Tresaith
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Tresaith is a wide sandy beach with a shop and a Restaurant close by. Part of the beach is pet friendly. There is limited public parking. The Cardi Bach bus service calls at Tresaith in the summer twice daily. Legend relates that seven princesses from Ireland landed here, fell in love with the sons of seven local Welsh families, married and settled down. This is why the settlement is called Tresaith (Welsh 'the Town of Seven').
Penbryn Beach, between Llangrannog and Tresaith is owned by the National Trust and was used for location filming for the James Bond film Die Another Day. There is a car park and small shop and cafe a few minutes walk from the beach. The Cardi Bach bus service calls at Penbryn in the summer twice daily. https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/penbryn
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Penbryn Beach
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Penbryn Beach, between Llangrannog and Tresaith is owned by the National Trust and was used for location filming for the James Bond film Die Another Day. There is a car park and small shop and cafe a few minutes walk from the beach. The Cardi Bach bus service calls at Penbryn in the summer twice daily. https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/penbryn
Llangrannog lies in the narrow valley of the little River Hawen, which falls as a waterfall near the middle of the village. By the beach there is a shop, two pubs The Ship and the Pentre Arms and two cafes. There is parking by the beach - in a pay car park and on the road. Overflow parking in the summer is in a field up the hill behind Llangrannog. The Cardi Bach bus service calls at Llangrannog in the summer twice daily. Part of the beach is dog friendly.
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Llangrannog Beach
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Llangrannog lies in the narrow valley of the little River Hawen, which falls as a waterfall near the middle of the village. By the beach there is a shop, two pubs The Ship and the Pentre Arms and two cafes. There is parking by the beach - in a pay car park and on the road. Overflow parking in the summer is in a field up the hill behind Llangrannog. The Cardi Bach bus service calls at Llangrannog in the summer twice daily. Part of the beach is dog friendly.
There is free parking above the beach, and a cafe just up the road. The Cardi Bach bus service calls at Cwmtydu in the summer twice daily. There is a well preserved lime kiln just above the beach.
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Cwmtydu Cove Car Park
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There is free parking above the beach, and a cafe just up the road. The Cardi Bach bus service calls at Cwmtydu in the summer twice daily. There is a well preserved lime kiln just above the beach.
This interesting beach is on the coastal path. There are the remains of an iron age fort on the flat section beyond the beach. There are also some spectacular folds in the mudstone rock here. It is believed that the 'island' was a part of the iron age fort, but that it has been separated by erosion from the sea since that time. Seals are often seen in such secluded coves along the Ceredigion coast.
Castell Bach Bay
This interesting beach is on the coastal path. There are the remains of an iron age fort on the flat section beyond the beach. There are also some spectacular folds in the mudstone rock here. It is believed that the 'island' was a part of the iron age fort, but that it has been separated by erosion from the sea since that time. Seals are often seen in such secluded coves along the Ceredigion coast.