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HM’s guidebook

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HM’s guidebook

Sightseeing
With 2 minutes by walking, you'll be able to enjoy the most elegant bridge of Budapest - Elisabeth Bridge, attracting the well-deserved attention of tourists due to its charming shape and snow-white color, with the Buda end of the bridge runs straight into the foot of Gellért Hill with the statue of St. Gellért who was thrown to his death from the hill by rebellious heathens in 1046. At the northern side, there is a nicely arranged park with a bronze statue of the eponym Queen Elizabeth. The baths Rác and Rudas are also to be found in this neighborhood.
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Elisabeth Bridge
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With 2 minutes by walking, you'll be able to enjoy the most elegant bridge of Budapest - Elisabeth Bridge, attracting the well-deserved attention of tourists due to its charming shape and snow-white color, with the Buda end of the bridge runs straight into the foot of Gellért Hill with the statue of St. Gellért who was thrown to his death from the hill by rebellious heathens in 1046. At the northern side, there is a nicely arranged park with a bronze statue of the eponym Queen Elizabeth. The baths Rác and Rudas are also to be found in this neighborhood.
The First Permanent Connection Between Buda and Pest. The Chain Bridge is one of the best known landmarks of Budapest. The picturesque historic stone bridge straddles the Danube between Széchenyi Square on the Pest side and Clark Ádám Square in Buda. You can walk across it from Buda to Pest and back – an excellent way to absorb the World Heritage-protected sights and panorama and to take wonderful photos. It offers one of the city’s most stunning views with the mighty Danube flowing below you. The grandiose Parliament dominates the riverside in Pest, while Castle Hill towers at the Buda end.
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Széchenyi Chain Bridge
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The First Permanent Connection Between Buda and Pest. The Chain Bridge is one of the best known landmarks of Budapest. The picturesque historic stone bridge straddles the Danube between Széchenyi Square on the Pest side and Clark Ádám Square in Buda. You can walk across it from Buda to Pest and back – an excellent way to absorb the World Heritage-protected sights and panorama and to take wonderful photos. It offers one of the city’s most stunning views with the mighty Danube flowing below you. The grandiose Parliament dominates the riverside in Pest, while Castle Hill towers at the Buda end.
The Liberty Statue on Gellert Hill is one of the few prominent Communist statues which remained in situ after the transition to democracy, in part because of its iconic location overlooking the city. The statue was first erected in 1947 to commemorate the Soviet troops who lost their lives liberating the country, however the engraving was later changed so that it commemorated “all who sacrificed their lives for the independence, freedom, and prosperity of Hungary”. The panoramic views from underneath the statue are unparalleled, and help to make the walk to the top of the hill well worth it.
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Liberty Statue
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The Liberty Statue on Gellert Hill is one of the few prominent Communist statues which remained in situ after the transition to democracy, in part because of its iconic location overlooking the city. The statue was first erected in 1947 to commemorate the Soviet troops who lost their lives liberating the country, however the engraving was later changed so that it commemorated “all who sacrificed their lives for the independence, freedom, and prosperity of Hungary”. The panoramic views from underneath the statue are unparalleled, and help to make the walk to the top of the hill well worth it.
The Citadel, which sits atop Gellert Hill, was constructed by the Hapsburgs following the failed Hungarian War of Independence. It was thought that its prime strategic position would make it easy to control both Buda and Pest, should any future uprisings occur. Troops were stationed at the Citadel until 1897. Soviet forces once again used the fortress to control the city during the 1956 Hungarian Revolution, and tanks which were situated there fired down on the city. The Citadel now houses a restaurant, a hotel and a museum.
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Citadella
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The Citadel, which sits atop Gellert Hill, was constructed by the Hapsburgs following the failed Hungarian War of Independence. It was thought that its prime strategic position would make it easy to control both Buda and Pest, should any future uprisings occur. Troops were stationed at the Citadel until 1897. Soviet forces once again used the fortress to control the city during the 1956 Hungarian Revolution, and tanks which were situated there fired down on the city. The Citadel now houses a restaurant, a hotel and a museum.
The Hungarian Parliament Building, which was designed and built in the Gothic Revival style, is one of the largest buildings in Hungary, and is home to hundreds of parliamentary offices. Although the impressive building looks fantastic from every angle, to see the whole building in its full glory, it is worth viewing it from the other side of the Danube. Tours of certain areas of the building are available daily, and run in different languages. You will need identification to get in, and your bag may be searched on entry.
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Hungarian Parliament Building
1-3 Kossuth Lajos tér
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The Hungarian Parliament Building, which was designed and built in the Gothic Revival style, is one of the largest buildings in Hungary, and is home to hundreds of parliamentary offices. Although the impressive building looks fantastic from every angle, to see the whole building in its full glory, it is worth viewing it from the other side of the Danube. Tours of certain areas of the building are available daily, and run in different languages. You will need identification to get in, and your bag may be searched on entry.
Heroes’ Square (Hosök tere), which marks the end of Andrássy Avenue is home to an iconic monument which features depictions of the Seven Chieftains of the Magyars, who are believed to have led the Hungarian people from central Asia to the Carpathian basin. Atop the central pillar is the Archangel Gabriel, who is holding the Hungarian crown. At either side of the central column are two matching colonnades, which depict a variety of other historical Hungarian figures. The impressive buildings at either side of the square are art galleries. Take care when crossing to the statue, because traffic around the monument can be erratic.
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Heroes' Square
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Heroes’ Square (Hosök tere), which marks the end of Andrássy Avenue is home to an iconic monument which features depictions of the Seven Chieftains of the Magyars, who are believed to have led the Hungarian people from central Asia to the Carpathian basin. Atop the central pillar is the Archangel Gabriel, who is holding the Hungarian crown. At either side of the central column are two matching colonnades, which depict a variety of other historical Hungarian figures. The impressive buildings at either side of the square are art galleries. Take care when crossing to the statue, because traffic around the monument can be erratic.
The largest church in Budapest, which can hold up to 8,500 people and is one of Hungary’s most iconic structures. The mummified right hand of the patron saint of the church and first king of Hungary, St Stephen, is kept in a glass case to the left of the main altar. And if that doesn’t turn you on, just check out all that monumental neoclassical architecture. The Basilica’s star feature is the 96-metre-high dome, lined on the inside with ornate religious reliefs. Once you’ve had a little wander, why not take in the impressive views from the cupola?
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St. Stephen's Basilica
1 Szent István tér
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The largest church in Budapest, which can hold up to 8,500 people and is one of Hungary’s most iconic structures. The mummified right hand of the patron saint of the church and first king of Hungary, St Stephen, is kept in a glass case to the left of the main altar. And if that doesn’t turn you on, just check out all that monumental neoclassical architecture. The Basilica’s star feature is the 96-metre-high dome, lined on the inside with ornate religious reliefs. Once you’ve had a little wander, why not take in the impressive views from the cupola?
This Neo-Renaissance building was first opened in 1884, following a commission from Emperor Franz Joseph. Outside of the building, you can see statues to Ferenc Erkel (composer of the Hungarian National Anthem) and Ferenc Liszt (Hungarian composer). The 1200 seat auditorium is considered to be one of the best in the world for operatic performances, and it is well worth it to buy a ticket to a show.
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Hungarian State Opera
22 Andrássy út
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This Neo-Renaissance building was first opened in 1884, following a commission from Emperor Franz Joseph. Outside of the building, you can see statues to Ferenc Erkel (composer of the Hungarian National Anthem) and Ferenc Liszt (Hungarian composer). The 1200 seat auditorium is considered to be one of the best in the world for operatic performances, and it is well worth it to buy a ticket to a show.
Although the Fisherman’s Bastion looks like a medieval monument, it was actually built in the early 20th century in a neo-Gothic style, specifically to act as a panoramic viewing platform across the Danube, Margaret Island and Pest. It is named after the Guild of Fishermen, which was responsible for defending that stretch of the city walls during the Middle Ages. The seven towers of the Bastion represent the seven Magyar tribes that helped to settle the Magyar people in the Carpathian Basin. Come at sunset to see a particularly beautiful view of the city.
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Fisherman's Bastion
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Although the Fisherman’s Bastion looks like a medieval monument, it was actually built in the early 20th century in a neo-Gothic style, specifically to act as a panoramic viewing platform across the Danube, Margaret Island and Pest. It is named after the Guild of Fishermen, which was responsible for defending that stretch of the city walls during the Middle Ages. The seven towers of the Bastion represent the seven Magyar tribes that helped to settle the Magyar people in the Carpathian Basin. Come at sunset to see a particularly beautiful view of the city.
A spectacular 13th-century palace that sits atop Castle Hill. Buda Castle is a Unesco world heritage site and also contains the Hungarian National Gallery, the Castle Museum, and the National Széchenyi Library. There’s no better place to get your culture fix.
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Buda Castle
2 Szent György tér
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A spectacular 13th-century palace that sits atop Castle Hill. Buda Castle is a Unesco world heritage site and also contains the Hungarian National Gallery, the Castle Museum, and the National Széchenyi Library. There’s no better place to get your culture fix.
Officially named the Church of the Assumption of the Buda Castle, Matthias Church sits in front of the Fisherman’s Bastion in the centre of Buda’s Castle District. The church’s first iteration (then dedicated to Mary) was built in 1015 under the first king of Hungary, Saint Stephen. The current building is remarkable for its late Gothic style, first constructed in the second half of the 14th century, and restored in the late 19th century. The name of the contemporary church refers not to Saint Matthias but to King Matthias Corvinus the Fair, who remodelled the building in the 15th century with the addition of the church’s southern tower, the appropriately named Matthias bell tower.
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Matthias Church
2 Szentháromság tér
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Officially named the Church of the Assumption of the Buda Castle, Matthias Church sits in front of the Fisherman’s Bastion in the centre of Buda’s Castle District. The church’s first iteration (then dedicated to Mary) was built in 1015 under the first king of Hungary, Saint Stephen. The current building is remarkable for its late Gothic style, first constructed in the second half of the 14th century, and restored in the late 19th century. The name of the contemporary church refers not to Saint Matthias but to King Matthias Corvinus the Fair, who remodelled the building in the 15th century with the addition of the church’s southern tower, the appropriately named Matthias bell tower.
A heartbreaking memorial to 3,500 people killed by fascists in Budapest during the Second World War. This poignant sculpture, made up of 60 pairs of cast iron shoes designed by Can Togay and Gyula Pauer on the banks of the Danube, commemorates the slaying of 3,500 civilians – including 800 Jews – killed by Arrow Cross militiamen in Budapest. The victims were ordered to remove their shoes by the fascist group, before being shot, their dead bodies falling into the river.
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Shoes on the Danube Bank
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A heartbreaking memorial to 3,500 people killed by fascists in Budapest during the Second World War. This poignant sculpture, made up of 60 pairs of cast iron shoes designed by Can Togay and Gyula Pauer on the banks of the Danube, commemorates the slaying of 3,500 civilians – including 800 Jews – killed by Arrow Cross militiamen in Budapest. The victims were ordered to remove their shoes by the fascist group, before being shot, their dead bodies falling into the river.
Opened in 1859, Budapest’s Great Synagogue is Europe’s largest place of Jewish worship (and the second biggest in the world). The stunning architecture and interior décor is worth the trip alone, but a visit to the Great Synagogue (aka Tabakgasse Synagogue) also aims to guide visitors through the history of Jews in Hungary. Inside you’ll find the Hungarian Jewish Museum & Archives, as well as the Holocaust Tree of Life Memorial.
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Dohány Street Synagogue
2 Dohány u.
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Opened in 1859, Budapest’s Great Synagogue is Europe’s largest place of Jewish worship (and the second biggest in the world). The stunning architecture and interior décor is worth the trip alone, but a visit to the Great Synagogue (aka Tabakgasse Synagogue) also aims to guide visitors through the history of Jews in Hungary. Inside you’ll find the Hungarian Jewish Museum & Archives, as well as the Holocaust Tree of Life Memorial.
Food scene
The Great Market Hall in central Budapest is Budapest’s most famous marketplace. Whilst many locals still use the market hall as a place to buy their groceries, the market is incredibly popular with the tourists too. Locally grown fruits and veg, and locally sourced meats are found on the lower floors, and souvenirs including lace, chess sets and leather goods are available in the upper floors. As well as individual ingredients, it is possible to pick up homemade local delicacies like goulash and langos from the food stall upstairs.
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Central Market Hall
1-3 Vámház krt.
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The Great Market Hall in central Budapest is Budapest’s most famous marketplace. Whilst many locals still use the market hall as a place to buy their groceries, the market is incredibly popular with the tourists too. Locally grown fruits and veg, and locally sourced meats are found on the lower floors, and souvenirs including lace, chess sets and leather goods are available in the upper floors. As well as individual ingredients, it is possible to pick up homemade local delicacies like goulash and langos from the food stall upstairs.
Perfect place to properly taste Hungarian cuisine (Fish soup, goulash, paprika chicken, meat dishes, etc..) with generous portions and reasonable prices. It's close to Heroes' square. You should make a reservation.
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Paprika Vendéglő
72 Dózsa György út
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Perfect place to properly taste Hungarian cuisine (Fish soup, goulash, paprika chicken, meat dishes, etc..) with generous portions and reasonable prices. It's close to Heroes' square. You should make a reservation.
Relaxing
The Széchenyi Baths complex is the largest “medicinal” bath centre in Europe. The waters are rich in sulphates, calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate and fluoride, which are believed to help patients with degenerative joint illnesses and other medical issues. For those who just want to enjoy the relaxing powers of the thermal pools, there are a variety of different thermal pools on site, as well as saunas and steam rooms. Massages and beauty treatments are also available at an additional fee. The two outdoor pools are fantastic places to visit on a cold, dark night, as the steam rising from the hot water makes the whole place seem wonderfully mysterious.
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Széchenyi Thermal Bath
9-11 Állatkerti krt.
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The Széchenyi Baths complex is the largest “medicinal” bath centre in Europe. The waters are rich in sulphates, calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate and fluoride, which are believed to help patients with degenerative joint illnesses and other medical issues. For those who just want to enjoy the relaxing powers of the thermal pools, there are a variety of different thermal pools on site, as well as saunas and steam rooms. Massages and beauty treatments are also available at an additional fee. The two outdoor pools are fantastic places to visit on a cold, dark night, as the steam rising from the hot water makes the whole place seem wonderfully mysterious.
Interest
Budapest’s ruin bars – unconventional hangout spots and nightclubs set up in abandoned buildings – have become the highlights of Budapest nightlife. As the first ruin bar established in Budapest, Szimpla Kert should be a first port of call when exploring ruin bar culture. Moving around a few times before settling into its current home in the Jewish Quarter in 2004, Szimpla Kert now hosts a farmers’ market and flea market during the day and live music and film screenings at night. Here, you can expect eclectic music and unique furniture, including an old Trabant car that has been repurposed as a quirky centrepiece in the outside courtyard. One of the most popular ruin bars in Budapest, Szimpla Kert can be explored as part of a wider ruin bar tour.
Ruin Bars Budapest
1b Dohány u.
Budapest’s ruin bars – unconventional hangout spots and nightclubs set up in abandoned buildings – have become the highlights of Budapest nightlife. As the first ruin bar established in Budapest, Szimpla Kert should be a first port of call when exploring ruin bar culture. Moving around a few times before settling into its current home in the Jewish Quarter in 2004, Szimpla Kert now hosts a farmers’ market and flea market during the day and live music and film screenings at night. Here, you can expect eclectic music and unique furniture, including an old Trabant car that has been repurposed as a quirky centrepiece in the outside courtyard. One of the most popular ruin bars in Budapest, Szimpla Kert can be explored as part of a wider ruin bar tour.
Budapest’s most famous street, Andrássy Avenue is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Lined with Neo-Renaissance mansions, Andrássy Avenue is heaven for shopaholics, thanks to the plethora of high-end fashion brands that find their home there. Those more interested in arts and culture will be fascinated by the elegant Hungarian State Opera House and the stretch nicknamed the “Broadway of Budapest” (at the intersection of Nagymező Street).
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Andrássy út
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Budapest’s most famous street, Andrássy Avenue is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Lined with Neo-Renaissance mansions, Andrássy Avenue is heaven for shopaholics, thanks to the plethora of high-end fashion brands that find their home there. Those more interested in arts and culture will be fascinated by the elegant Hungarian State Opera House and the stretch nicknamed the “Broadway of Budapest” (at the intersection of Nagymező Street).
Gozsdu Courtyard is one of the most dynamically improving centres in the downtown of Budapest; it is a meeting point that combines entertainment, gastronomy and culture. The entertainment quarter is awaiting its guests with uniquely exciting programmes every day of the week. The Courtyard makes room for countless places, representing extraordinarystyles, thus providing colourful experience for all generations. As the entertainment centre of the downtown, it attracts more than 900,000 visiors per annum; due to its cosmopolitan nature it has become extremely popular between both the residents of Budapest and the tourists.
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Gozsdu Udvar
13 Király u.
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Gozsdu Courtyard is one of the most dynamically improving centres in the downtown of Budapest; it is a meeting point that combines entertainment, gastronomy and culture. The entertainment quarter is awaiting its guests with uniquely exciting programmes every day of the week. The Courtyard makes room for countless places, representing extraordinarystyles, thus providing colourful experience for all generations. As the entertainment centre of the downtown, it attracts more than 900,000 visiors per annum; due to its cosmopolitan nature it has become extremely popular between both the residents of Budapest and the tourists.