Things to do around Le Moulin de Beaufils

Lachlan

Things to do around Le Moulin de Beaufils

Sightseeing
The moulin is ideally located central to many historical and other delights. Two abbeys worth visiting are l’abbaye de Hambye and l’abbaye de la Lucerne. L’Abbaye de Hambye is a beautiful 12th century ruined Benedictine abbey set, like the moulin, in the valley floor of the Sienne. There are often activities, generally with a medieval theme. You will need to check at the boutique for what is on offer from week to week. There are also lots of walks around the immediate area for the more adventurous. The Abbey was founded around 1145 by William Painel, Lord of Hambye, and Algare, bishop of Coutances. The monastery was established by Benedictine monks from Tiron (Perche region in south-east of Basse-Normandie). Fuelled by an ideal of rigor and austerity close to that of Cistercians, Benedictine monks built a sober and elegant abbey, typical of the early Gothic period. The construction took place in the late 12th and early 13th centuries. The religious community reached its apogee in the 13th century and then, after a long decline over the following centuries, disappeared in the 1780s. Like all French abbeys, it became national property at the beginning of the Revolution. Eventually, the abbey was sold in 1790. The new owners transformed or destroyed buildings and scattered the furnishings. Having belonged to the abbey for three centuries (16th-18th centuries), the altarpiece was also sold. The convent buildings became farm buildings. The abbey church was used as a quarry from 1810 and was gradually dismantled.
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Abbey Hambye
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The moulin is ideally located central to many historical and other delights. Two abbeys worth visiting are l’abbaye de Hambye and l’abbaye de la Lucerne. L’Abbaye de Hambye is a beautiful 12th century ruined Benedictine abbey set, like the moulin, in the valley floor of the Sienne. There are often activities, generally with a medieval theme. You will need to check at the boutique for what is on offer from week to week. There are also lots of walks around the immediate area for the more adventurous. The Abbey was founded around 1145 by William Painel, Lord of Hambye, and Algare, bishop of Coutances. The monastery was established by Benedictine monks from Tiron (Perche region in south-east of Basse-Normandie). Fuelled by an ideal of rigor and austerity close to that of Cistercians, Benedictine monks built a sober and elegant abbey, typical of the early Gothic period. The construction took place in the late 12th and early 13th centuries. The religious community reached its apogee in the 13th century and then, after a long decline over the following centuries, disappeared in the 1780s. Like all French abbeys, it became national property at the beginning of the Revolution. Eventually, the abbey was sold in 1790. The new owners transformed or destroyed buildings and scattered the furnishings. Having belonged to the abbey for three centuries (16th-18th centuries), the altarpiece was also sold. The convent buildings became farm buildings. The abbey church was used as a quarry from 1810 and was gradually dismantled.
This Abbaye is about 25-30 mins away near La Lucerne-d'Outremer. It has some stunningly beautiful grounds with a 14th C moulin and an aqueduct. Church services are still held there. Reconstruction has been carried since 1959. The abbey was founded in 1143 by Hasculf de Subligny, son of Othoerne, the tutor of William Adelin, both of whom perished in the White Ship disaster of 1120, and later had the support of the English crown. The new monastery was settled from Dommartin Abbey near Hesdin. The foundation stone of the permanent buildings was laid in 1164 by Achard of St. Victor, who was later buried here. Construction lasted from 1164 to 1178 and was in the Romanesque style, in the restrained and sober manner of Cistercian architecture, except that the complex was dominated by an Anglo-Norman Gothic tower. La Lucerne was the mother-house of four other Premonstratensian monasteries: Ardenne Abbey, Mondaye Abbey and Belle-Étoile Abbey (at Cerisy-Belle-Étoile) in Normandy, and Beauport Abbey in Brittany. Major structural renovations were carried out in the 15th and 17th centuries. During the French Revolution, in 1792, the abbey was suppressed. Its buildings were at first turned into a cotton mill and then used as a source of stone.
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La Lucerne Abbey
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This Abbaye is about 25-30 mins away near La Lucerne-d'Outremer. It has some stunningly beautiful grounds with a 14th C moulin and an aqueduct. Church services are still held there. Reconstruction has been carried since 1959. The abbey was founded in 1143 by Hasculf de Subligny, son of Othoerne, the tutor of William Adelin, both of whom perished in the White Ship disaster of 1120, and later had the support of the English crown. The new monastery was settled from Dommartin Abbey near Hesdin. The foundation stone of the permanent buildings was laid in 1164 by Achard of St. Victor, who was later buried here. Construction lasted from 1164 to 1178 and was in the Romanesque style, in the restrained and sober manner of Cistercian architecture, except that the complex was dominated by an Anglo-Norman Gothic tower. La Lucerne was the mother-house of four other Premonstratensian monasteries: Ardenne Abbey, Mondaye Abbey and Belle-Étoile Abbey (at Cerisy-Belle-Étoile) in Normandy, and Beauport Abbey in Brittany. Major structural renovations were carried out in the 15th and 17th centuries. During the French Revolution, in 1792, the abbey was suppressed. Its buildings were at first turned into a cotton mill and then used as a source of stone.
Coutances sits on a 700 million year old volcano! The soil from which has allowed the creation of some wonderful gardens here. Once called Cosedia, the capital of the Celtic Unelles, it was renamed Constantia in the 4th century AD, in homage to the Roman emperor Flavius Constantius Chlorus (father of Constantine the Great). Variations of the name appeared at various times: Constantia (~400), Constances (1210), Coustances (1283 and again in 1437), Constances (1497 and 1608), Coutances (1631). Roman name derivation is rare in France. Although a great many cities and towns were founded, named or re-named by the Romans when they occupied Gaul (France) for around 500 years from the time Julius Caesar finally defeated Vercingetorix at the Battle of Alesia in 52 BC, most lost their Roman titles after the Romans left. When the Romans left in 486 AD , most city names were often changed to reflect the names of the Gallic tribes that occupied that region. Some (such as our local town of Hambye) have Frankish names after the Franks took over Gaul in the power vacuum left after the Romans departed. Coutances, however, retained its Roman name, probably in deference to its Christian connotations - Christianity having taken hold in most of the empire. (If you get to the Scriptorial in Avranches you will see how easy it would be have been for a scribe to mistake an ‘n’ for ‘u’ when transcribing a text - hence the change from Constances to Coustances to Coutances).
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Coutances
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Coutances sits on a 700 million year old volcano! The soil from which has allowed the creation of some wonderful gardens here. Once called Cosedia, the capital of the Celtic Unelles, it was renamed Constantia in the 4th century AD, in homage to the Roman emperor Flavius Constantius Chlorus (father of Constantine the Great). Variations of the name appeared at various times: Constantia (~400), Constances (1210), Coustances (1283 and again in 1437), Constances (1497 and 1608), Coutances (1631). Roman name derivation is rare in France. Although a great many cities and towns were founded, named or re-named by the Romans when they occupied Gaul (France) for around 500 years from the time Julius Caesar finally defeated Vercingetorix at the Battle of Alesia in 52 BC, most lost their Roman titles after the Romans left. When the Romans left in 486 AD , most city names were often changed to reflect the names of the Gallic tribes that occupied that region. Some (such as our local town of Hambye) have Frankish names after the Franks took over Gaul in the power vacuum left after the Romans departed. Coutances, however, retained its Roman name, probably in deference to its Christian connotations - Christianity having taken hold in most of the empire. (If you get to the Scriptorial in Avranches you will see how easy it would be have been for a scribe to mistake an ‘n’ for ‘u’ when transcribing a text - hence the change from Constances to Coustances to Coutances).
Coutances Cathedral is a beautiful structure that was not destroyed during the French Revolution, and miraculously barely touched during the tumult of the Allied bombings and landings of 1944 - even though much else around it was destroyed! The cathedral’s roots date back to when a Roman temple occupied the spot. This temple was changed into a church in the 5th century AD, which was later destroyed by Vikings in 866 AD – as was the original Roman aqueduct. Two centuries later the church was rebuilt as a Romanesque cathedral and was consecrated in 1056 in the presence of William the Bastard (better known later, perhaps, as William the Conqueror!). in 1180 it was restored and altered and in the 13th century transformed into the Norman Gothic style, although aspects (such as the twin towers and the columns in the nave are from the original Romanesque period). It is possible that the columns (or sections of them) date to the original Roman temple/basilica. One of the 13th century stained glass windows depicts the life of Thomas Becket.
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Coutances Cathedral
1 Rue du Puits Notre Dame
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Coutances Cathedral is a beautiful structure that was not destroyed during the French Revolution, and miraculously barely touched during the tumult of the Allied bombings and landings of 1944 - even though much else around it was destroyed! The cathedral’s roots date back to when a Roman temple occupied the spot. This temple was changed into a church in the 5th century AD, which was later destroyed by Vikings in 866 AD – as was the original Roman aqueduct. Two centuries later the church was rebuilt as a Romanesque cathedral and was consecrated in 1056 in the presence of William the Bastard (better known later, perhaps, as William the Conqueror!). in 1180 it was restored and altered and in the 13th century transformed into the Norman Gothic style, although aspects (such as the twin towers and the columns in the nave are from the original Romanesque period). It is possible that the columns (or sections of them) date to the original Roman temple/basilica. One of the 13th century stained glass windows depicts the life of Thomas Becket.
A simply beautiful Église that NO ONE visits. This is probably both good and bad. You will have no one to disturb you whilst perusing its wonders. Built from the 11th century on the Église boasts a 14th century fresco of the Last Supper with a twist in the tail (I won’t spoil the surprise) and a 16th century fresco of the trials of Sainte Barbe (Saint Barbara). There is also a 16th sculpture of the Madonna and Child. These were all saved from the French Revolutionary Guards by a quick thinking parishioner or cleric who whitewashed the frescoes and buried the sculpture. These were all rediscovered in the late 19th century!! Outside there are around 50 modillions in the form of grotesques dating to the 12th century designed to ward off evil spirits. Obviously, a belief in Christ wasn’t enough for 12th century worshippers!!
Église Notre-Dame de Savigny
A simply beautiful Église that NO ONE visits. This is probably both good and bad. You will have no one to disturb you whilst perusing its wonders. Built from the 11th century on the Église boasts a 14th century fresco of the Last Supper with a twist in the tail (I won’t spoil the surprise) and a 16th century fresco of the trials of Sainte Barbe (Saint Barbara). There is also a 16th sculpture of the Madonna and Child. These were all saved from the French Revolutionary Guards by a quick thinking parishioner or cleric who whitewashed the frescoes and buried the sculpture. These were all rediscovered in the late 19th century!! Outside there are around 50 modillions in the form of grotesques dating to the 12th century designed to ward off evil spirits. Obviously, a belief in Christ wasn’t enough for 12th century worshippers!!
Nice views of Gavray. Interesting site. Difficult to get parking nearby. Probably easiest to park at the bottom of the hill near Gavray and climb up.
Château ducal
19 Rue Haute Rue
Nice views of Gavray. Interesting site. Difficult to get parking nearby. Probably easiest to park at the bottom of the hill near Gavray and climb up.
What can one say? Many ways to get there. Bus. Horse drawn carriage. By foot. Also guided walking tours across the bay to the Mont (prepare to get wet in the process). A unique experience.
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Mont Saint-Michel
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What can one say? Many ways to get there. Bus. Horse drawn carriage. By foot. Also guided walking tours across the bay to the Mont (prepare to get wet in the process). A unique experience.
The WWII Normandy landing beaches need no introduction. Your choice as to where you go. Lots of different museums. Re-enactments are usually carried out around the annual anniversary of the landing date (6th June 1944). All very sobering. Lamentably much of historic Normandy was destroyed in the process - mainly from Allied bombings prior to and during the Landings.
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Utah Beach
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The WWII Normandy landing beaches need no introduction. Your choice as to where you go. Lots of different museums. Re-enactments are usually carried out around the annual anniversary of the landing date (6th June 1944). All very sobering. Lamentably much of historic Normandy was destroyed in the process - mainly from Allied bombings prior to and during the Landings.
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Omaha Beach
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Pointe du Hoc D Day Monument
Gold Beach
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Juno Beach
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Juno Beach Centre
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Sword Beach
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Sword Beach - Queen Red
Plage de la Vieille Église
Slightly over an hour away, the birthplace of William the Conqueror is s fun place to visit. Address: Place Guillaume le Conquérant, 14700 Falaise, France
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Château Guillaume-le-Conquérant
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Slightly over an hour away, the birthplace of William the Conqueror is s fun place to visit. Address: Place Guillaume le Conquérant, 14700 Falaise, France
Sightseeing and food scene
Avranches is a beautiful place that boasts the Mont-St-Michel Scriptorial. There are many ancient parchments on display in the scriptorial. There are also a lot of kids’ activities to keep the younger ones amused. A must-see BEFORE the Mont itself as it gives a very good history the development of the Mont which gives a better understanding of what you’re looking at whilst on the site. Although the cathedral where Henry II did penance for his part in the assassination of Thomas Becket no longer exists (it was destroyed during the French Revolution) its ground plan can still be seen in situ. The views over the ocean from where the original front doors stood are spectacular. A quiet reflective place. One of the large sarcophagi from the cathedral excavated in the 1970s can be seen in the Scriptoral (there is no sign in the Scriptorial itself to indicate this!!). Lots and lots of eateries. Your choice!!!
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Avranches
5 Rue de Geôle
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Avranches is a beautiful place that boasts the Mont-St-Michel Scriptorial. There are many ancient parchments on display in the scriptorial. There are also a lot of kids’ activities to keep the younger ones amused. A must-see BEFORE the Mont itself as it gives a very good history the development of the Mont which gives a better understanding of what you’re looking at whilst on the site. Although the cathedral where Henry II did penance for his part in the assassination of Thomas Becket no longer exists (it was destroyed during the French Revolution) its ground plan can still be seen in situ. The views over the ocean from where the original front doors stood are spectacular. A quiet reflective place. One of the large sarcophagi from the cathedral excavated in the 1970s can be seen in the Scriptoral (there is no sign in the Scriptorial itself to indicate this!!). Lots and lots of eateries. Your choice!!!
Home to the famous tapestry (actually an embroidery) Bayeux is a beautiful town with much to see. Combination tickets are available for the tapestry museum and others. It is worthwhile getting there early to avoid the crowds.
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Bayeux
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Home to the famous tapestry (actually an embroidery) Bayeux is a beautiful town with much to see. Combination tickets are available for the tapestry museum and others. It is worthwhile getting there early to avoid the crowds.
The ‘Monaco of the North’ was founded by a vassal of William the Bastard (Conquerer) in the 11th century AD. It then became a fortified privateer city as part of the defences of Mont-St-Michel. In the 19th century it was ‘re-invented’ as a sea-side resort and was where Christian Dior grew up. It is also home to the famous 27-hole Granville golf course. Cliff-top walks abound and the beaches are picturesque. Also there are many shopping opportunities and the Brasserie au Pirate serves fabulous coffee. The best I’ve found in France so far!!!
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Granville
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The ‘Monaco of the North’ was founded by a vassal of William the Bastard (Conquerer) in the 11th century AD. It then became a fortified privateer city as part of the defences of Mont-St-Michel. In the 19th century it was ‘re-invented’ as a sea-side resort and was where Christian Dior grew up. It is also home to the famous 27-hole Granville golf course. Cliff-top walks abound and the beaches are picturesque. Also there are many shopping opportunities and the Brasserie au Pirate serves fabulous coffee. The best I’ve found in France so far!!!
If you are a fashion aficionado then the Christian Dior Museum is a must see whilst in Granville. The Belle Époque mansion was originally the Dior family home before they moved to Paris and continued as a sea-side holiday home (and a retreat during the ravages of the First World War) until the Diors were forced to sell it to the town of Granville in 1932. There are magnificent sea views from the cliff top and in a clear day you can see the islands of Chausey and even Jersey. Perfume workshops are held in September. Open: May to October Address: 1 Rue d'Estouteville, 50400 Granville, France
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Musée Christian Dior
1 Rue d'Estouteville
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If you are a fashion aficionado then the Christian Dior Museum is a must see whilst in Granville. The Belle Époque mansion was originally the Dior family home before they moved to Paris and continued as a sea-side holiday home (and a retreat during the ravages of the First World War) until the Diors were forced to sell it to the town of Granville in 1932. There are magnificent sea views from the cliff top and in a clear day you can see the islands of Chausey and even Jersey. Perfume workshops are held in September. Open: May to October Address: 1 Rue d'Estouteville, 50400 Granville, France
Villedieu-les-Poeles is a historic metal-working town that lies about 20 mins away from the moulin through some beautiful French countryside. It boasts nice eateries, bars and shopping opportunities. Although a little too touristy (and thus expensive) for my liking it is well worth a visit. It was granted to the Knights Hospitaller by Henry I, King of England and Duke of Normandy, in the 12th century. It is thought that copper smithing was introduced by the Knights from the Near East. By the 14th century the Corporation of the Coppersmiths of Villedieu was officially recognized by the Kings of France. The inhabitants of Villedieu were strong Revolutionaries (unlike most of the surrounding area) mainly because the Revolution abolished customs duties between French regions (hip pockets always important in politics!!). It was saved from Allied bombings during WW II by its quick-thinking mayor.
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Villedieu-les-Poêles
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Villedieu-les-Poeles is a historic metal-working town that lies about 20 mins away from the moulin through some beautiful French countryside. It boasts nice eateries, bars and shopping opportunities. Although a little too touristy (and thus expensive) for my liking it is well worth a visit. It was granted to the Knights Hospitaller by Henry I, King of England and Duke of Normandy, in the 12th century. It is thought that copper smithing was introduced by the Knights from the Near East. By the 14th century the Corporation of the Coppersmiths of Villedieu was officially recognized by the Kings of France. The inhabitants of Villedieu were strong Revolutionaries (unlike most of the surrounding area) mainly because the Revolution abolished customs duties between French regions (hip pockets always important in politics!!). It was saved from Allied bombings during WW II by its quick-thinking mayor.
Golfing
One of only a handful of 27-hole golf courses worldwide. If you are into golf you MUST play this course.
Granville Golf Club
1 Impasse des Dunes
One of only a handful of 27-hole golf courses worldwide. If you are into golf you MUST play this course.
18-hole golf course
Coutainville Golf Club
6 Avenue du Golf
18-hole golf course
Small 9 hole course
Golf Bréhal
3 Rue du Golf
Small 9 hole course
A Mini Golf course of 18 holes along le Hamel Soyer in La Baleine. Good for kids. Beautiful garden. Serves crepes, galettes and homemade cider. Google maps says it would take 30mins on foot but it takes you the wrong way via l’Isle. Again just follow the track up behind the gite. More like 15-20 mins (max). Biking there would take 5-10 mins.
Le Hamel Soyer
A Mini Golf course of 18 holes along le Hamel Soyer in La Baleine. Good for kids. Beautiful garden. Serves crepes, galettes and homemade cider. Google maps says it would take 30mins on foot but it takes you the wrong way via l’Isle. Again just follow the track up behind the gite. More like 15-20 mins (max). Biking there would take 5-10 mins.
Beaches
If you want to visit one of THE top beaches in France then this is it!! So far it is not as ‘touristy’ as many of its neighbours and presents a beautiful place to relax. There are other beaches around but if you only have time for one then you must visit Montmartin-sur-Mer!
Montmartin-sur-Mer
If you want to visit one of THE top beaches in France then this is it!! So far it is not as ‘touristy’ as many of its neighbours and presents a beautiful place to relax. There are other beaches around but if you only have time for one then you must visit Montmartin-sur-Mer!
Plage du Plat Gousset is just to the north of Granville. The beach is not monitored (patrolled) and parking (paid) can be difficult to find. There are bars and restaurants nearby. Good to visit if you’re in Granville already but in my opinion not as nice as Montmartin-sur-Mer.
Plage du Plat Gousset
Plage du Plat Gousset is just to the north of Granville. The beach is not monitored (patrolled) and parking (paid) can be difficult to find. There are bars and restaurants nearby. Good to visit if you’re in Granville already but in my opinion not as nice as Montmartin-sur-Mer.
Food scene
Within walking distance (15 mins) of the moulin. If walking do not follow Google suggestions as they take you through farmers’ fields along the Sienne. Take the track up behind the gite through to La Baleine. This restaurant is very reasonably priced. Open from lunch on Wednesday to lunch on Sunday. T: +33(0)2 33 51 39 42 E-mail: labaleine.lekrill@gmail.com
Le Krill
Within walking distance (15 mins) of the moulin. If walking do not follow Google suggestions as they take you through farmers’ fields along the Sienne. Take the track up behind the gite through to La Baleine. This restaurant is very reasonably priced. Open from lunch on Wednesday to lunch on Sunday. T: +33(0)2 33 51 39 42 E-mail: labaleine.lekrill@gmail.com
A gourmet restaurant only a 5 min drive from the moulin and adjacent to l’Abbaye de Hambye. Just follow the signs to the abbey from the centre of Hambye. Open from lunch on Tuesday to lunch on Sunday. T: +33(0)2 33 61 42 19 E-mail: aubergedelabbaye@wanadoo.fr
Auberge de l'Abbaye d'Hambye
5 Route de l'Abbaye
A gourmet restaurant only a 5 min drive from the moulin and adjacent to l’Abbaye de Hambye. Just follow the signs to the abbey from the centre of Hambye. Open from lunch on Tuesday to lunch on Sunday. T: +33(0)2 33 61 42 19 E-mail: aubergedelabbaye@wanadoo.fr
Open Wednesday to Saturday 12:00-14:00 and 19:00-21:15. Sundays 12:00-15:00 Address: 9 Place du Docteur Beck, 50450 Gavray Ph: +33 2 33 51 61 14
Restaurant du Délice - Emmanuel Heusser
9 Place Doct Beck
Open Wednesday to Saturday 12:00-14:00 and 19:00-21:15. Sundays 12:00-15:00 Address: 9 Place du Docteur Beck, 50450 Gavray Ph: +33 2 33 51 61 14
Open for lunch Monday to Saturday and for dinner Monday to Friday. Address: 23 Place de la Mairie, 50450 Gavray Ph: +33 (0) 2.33.61.49.55
HÔTEL DE LA GARE
23 Place de la Mairie
Open for lunch Monday to Saturday and for dinner Monday to Friday. Address: 23 Place de la Mairie, 50450 Gavray Ph: +33 (0) 2.33.61.49.55
Address: 11 Place du Docteur Beck, 50450 Gavray.
Bar des Sports
11 Place du Dr Beck
Address: 11 Place du Docteur Beck, 50450 Gavray.
Open 09:30-15:00 and 18:30-20:30 Monday to Friday. 10:00-15:00 Saturday Address: 18 Rue de la Poterie, 50450 Gavray. Ph: +33 9 82 35 13 29 Email: l.epicerie.bar.restaurant@gmail.com
L'Epicerie Bar-Restaurant
Open 09:30-15:00 and 18:30-20:30 Monday to Friday. 10:00-15:00 Saturday Address: 18 Rue de la Poterie, 50450 Gavray. Ph: +33 9 82 35 13 29 Email: l.epicerie.bar.restaurant@gmail.com
Bars
L’adresse in Hambye is a cosy bar with a daily set lunch. It is a favourite with locals and has that quintessential rural Normandy feel. Hours: Open for lunch and dinner. Address: 12 rue de Louis d’Estouteville, 50450 Hambye. Ph: +33 2 50 26 93 07
L'adresse
12 Rue Louis d'Estouteville
L’adresse in Hambye is a cosy bar with a daily set lunch. It is a favourite with locals and has that quintessential rural Normandy feel. Hours: Open for lunch and dinner. Address: 12 rue de Louis d’Estouteville, 50450 Hambye. Ph: +33 2 50 26 93 07
Supermarket
The Coccinelle Express is a small and very friendly supermarket open 7 days but only in the morning on Sundays and Mondays. Fuel available 24 hrs. Hours: Tue-Sat: 08:30-12:30 & 15:00-19:30 Sun & Mon: 8:30-12:30 Address: 8 Rue la Croix au Breton, 50450 Hambye
Coccinelle - Express - Hambye
8 Rue la Croix au Breton
The Coccinelle Express is a small and very friendly supermarket open 7 days but only in the morning on Sundays and Mondays. Fuel available 24 hrs. Hours: Tue-Sat: 08:30-12:30 & 15:00-19:30 Sun & Mon: 8:30-12:30 Address: 8 Rue la Croix au Breton, 50450 Hambye