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Ailish’s guidebook

Ailish

Ailish’s guidebook

Sightseeing
Over the years, the ‘Craft Centre’, as it is known locally, has been home to a wide range of talented artists and craftspeople. Of course, no centre of its kind would be complete without a place to sit down and relax over a nice cup of coffee, and An Cheardlann is proud to host one of the finest award-winning cafés in Ireland; An Builín Blasta. It’s well worth a visit. See more at: https://www.spiddalcrafts.com/
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Spiddal Craft and Design Studios
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Over the years, the ‘Craft Centre’, as it is known locally, has been home to a wide range of talented artists and craftspeople. Of course, no centre of its kind would be complete without a place to sit down and relax over a nice cup of coffee, and An Cheardlann is proud to host one of the finest award-winning cafés in Ireland; An Builín Blasta. It’s well worth a visit. See more at: https://www.spiddalcrafts.com/
Trá an Doilín (The Coral Strand) is a beautiful golden coral strand situated in An Cheathrú Rua. It is unusual in the sense that there are not many coral beaches in Galway. A lifeguard is on duty in the summer and it also boasts a Blue Flag.
The Coral Strand
Trá an Doilín (The Coral Strand) is a beautiful golden coral strand situated in An Cheathrú Rua. It is unusual in the sense that there are not many coral beaches in Galway. A lifeguard is on duty in the summer and it also boasts a Blue Flag.
Situated in the West of Ireland in County Galway, Connemara National Park covers some 2,000 hectares of scenic mountains, expanses of bogs, heaths, grasslands and woodlands. Some of the Park’s mountains, namely Benbaun, Bencullagh, Benbrack and Muckanaght, are part of the famous Twelve Bens or Beanna Beola range. Connemara National Park was established and opened to the public in 1980. Much of the present Park lands formed part of the Kylemore Abbey Estate and the Letterfrack Industrial School, the remainder having been owned by private individuals. The southern part of the Park was at one time owned by Richard (Humanity Dick) Martin who helped to form the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals during the early 19th century. The Park lands are now wholly owned by the State and managed solely for National Park purpose.
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Connemara National Park
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Situated in the West of Ireland in County Galway, Connemara National Park covers some 2,000 hectares of scenic mountains, expanses of bogs, heaths, grasslands and woodlands. Some of the Park’s mountains, namely Benbaun, Bencullagh, Benbrack and Muckanaght, are part of the famous Twelve Bens or Beanna Beola range. Connemara National Park was established and opened to the public in 1980. Much of the present Park lands formed part of the Kylemore Abbey Estate and the Letterfrack Industrial School, the remainder having been owned by private individuals. The southern part of the Park was at one time owned by Richard (Humanity Dick) Martin who helped to form the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals during the early 19th century. The Park lands are now wholly owned by the State and managed solely for National Park purpose.
At Kylemore Abbey and Victorian Walled Garden, there is so much for all the family to enjoy. Visit the restored rooms of the Abbey and learn about its history of tragedy, romance, education, innovation, and spirituality. Explore the 6 acre Victorian Walled Garden with its delightfully restored garden buildings. Discover woodland and lakeshore walks that will take you on a beautiful journey through our 1,000-acre estate. The beautiful Gothic Church is a short walk from the Abbey, nestled nearby is the Mausoleum where Mitchell and Margaret Henry are buried side by side. Children will enjoy making a wish at the Giants Ironing stone. With great options for dining and shopping, we have all you need for the perfect Connemara day out.
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Kylemore Abbey & Victorian Walled Garden
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At Kylemore Abbey and Victorian Walled Garden, there is so much for all the family to enjoy. Visit the restored rooms of the Abbey and learn about its history of tragedy, romance, education, innovation, and spirituality. Explore the 6 acre Victorian Walled Garden with its delightfully restored garden buildings. Discover woodland and lakeshore walks that will take you on a beautiful journey through our 1,000-acre estate. The beautiful Gothic Church is a short walk from the Abbey, nestled nearby is the Mausoleum where Mitchell and Margaret Henry are buried side by side. Children will enjoy making a wish at the Giants Ironing stone. With great options for dining and shopping, we have all you need for the perfect Connemara day out.
Glengowla Mines and working farm are steeped in history. In those days, monks often put valuable covers on their books and manuscripts, and the silver and other precious metals found here were sought after. The first miners at Glengowla were the Hodgsons from Gortevagh. Book covers were often made of metal and decorated with valuables such as jewels. The monks paid silversmiths to make gold and silver chalices. An example of these chalices is the Ardagh Chalice, which you can see in the National Museum in Dublin. The Ardagh Chalice was made in the eight century AD. Ireland is the biggest miner of lead in Europe and along with the lead found at Glengowla when mining started, there were large marble chambers and caverns studded with lead and silver pyrite and veins of calcite and quartz in addition to other precious materials. The mine is noted for its rare and beautiful octahedral crystals of fluorite and quartz. The Geoghegan family became the first owners of Glengowla after Independence and it was probably due to the Great Famine that mining started in 1850.
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Glengowla mines
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Glengowla Mines and working farm are steeped in history. In those days, monks often put valuable covers on their books and manuscripts, and the silver and other precious metals found here were sought after. The first miners at Glengowla were the Hodgsons from Gortevagh. Book covers were often made of metal and decorated with valuables such as jewels. The monks paid silversmiths to make gold and silver chalices. An example of these chalices is the Ardagh Chalice, which you can see in the National Museum in Dublin. The Ardagh Chalice was made in the eight century AD. Ireland is the biggest miner of lead in Europe and along with the lead found at Glengowla when mining started, there were large marble chambers and caverns studded with lead and silver pyrite and veins of calcite and quartz in addition to other precious materials. The mine is noted for its rare and beautiful octahedral crystals of fluorite and quartz. The Geoghegan family became the first owners of Glengowla after Independence and it was probably due to the Great Famine that mining started in 1850.
Brigit's Garden takes you on a magical journey into the heart of Celtic heritage and mythology, making it one of the truly outstanding places to visit in the West of Ireland. The award-winning Celtic Gardens are widely regarded as one of the most spectacular in Ireland, set within 11 acres of native woodland & wildflower meadows. In addition to the Celtic Gardens visitors can enjoy the nature trail, an ancient ring fort (fairy fort), thatched roundhouse and crannóg, and the calendar sundial, the largest in Ireland. Brigit’s Garden is very family-friendly with a kids’ discovery trail, a natural playground and lots of opportunity to explore. The Visitor Centre houses the Garden Café with excellent fresh food, the colourful Gift Shop and a function room. Brigit’s Garden offers a fully professional service to tour groups and community groups with guided tours of the Celtic Gardens, add-on workshops, group catering and bespoke programmes. They offer a full calendar of family-friendly special events throughout the year, from Brigit’s Day celebrations to an alternative Santa experience. Brigit's Garden is a Discover Science Centre and a popular destination for primary schools, with exciting programmes linked to nature and heritage. The high-standard facilities and tranquil surroundings make Brigit's Garden the ideal venue with a difference for weddings, meetings and special events.
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Brigit's Garden & Café
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Brigit's Garden takes you on a magical journey into the heart of Celtic heritage and mythology, making it one of the truly outstanding places to visit in the West of Ireland. The award-winning Celtic Gardens are widely regarded as one of the most spectacular in Ireland, set within 11 acres of native woodland & wildflower meadows. In addition to the Celtic Gardens visitors can enjoy the nature trail, an ancient ring fort (fairy fort), thatched roundhouse and crannóg, and the calendar sundial, the largest in Ireland. Brigit’s Garden is very family-friendly with a kids’ discovery trail, a natural playground and lots of opportunity to explore. The Visitor Centre houses the Garden Café with excellent fresh food, the colourful Gift Shop and a function room. Brigit’s Garden offers a fully professional service to tour groups and community groups with guided tours of the Celtic Gardens, add-on workshops, group catering and bespoke programmes. They offer a full calendar of family-friendly special events throughout the year, from Brigit’s Day celebrations to an alternative Santa experience. Brigit's Garden is a Discover Science Centre and a popular destination for primary schools, with exciting programmes linked to nature and heritage. The high-standard facilities and tranquil surroundings make Brigit's Garden the ideal venue with a difference for weddings, meetings and special events.
The Museum is ranked the 11th most popular free tourist attraction in Ireland. Galway City Museum has three floors of exciting exhibitions engaging visitors in the archaeology, history and sea science of Galway. The attraction is one of Galway’s most popular cultural hotspots and welcomes over 200,000 visitors per year. The Museum has been a recipient of TripAdvisor’s Certificate of Excellence for five years running and the 2016 Expert’s Choice award, ranking it among the ‘highest rated attractions in Galway’. Most recently we were awarded Full Accreditation status from the Heritage Council’s Museum Standards Programme for Ireland.
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Galway City Museum
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The Museum is ranked the 11th most popular free tourist attraction in Ireland. Galway City Museum has three floors of exciting exhibitions engaging visitors in the archaeology, history and sea science of Galway. The attraction is one of Galway’s most popular cultural hotspots and welcomes over 200,000 visitors per year. The Museum has been a recipient of TripAdvisor’s Certificate of Excellence for five years running and the 2016 Expert’s Choice award, ranking it among the ‘highest rated attractions in Galway’. Most recently we were awarded Full Accreditation status from the Heritage Council’s Museum Standards Programme for Ireland.
The Aran Islands are located in the middle of the Wild Atlantic Way. They are reached by Ferry from Ros a' Mhíl (which is the port when coming from Connemara & Galway). There is also a small flight service to the Aran Islands.
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Inishmore
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The Aran Islands are located in the middle of the Wild Atlantic Way. They are reached by Ferry from Ros a' Mhíl (which is the port when coming from Connemara & Galway). There is also a small flight service to the Aran Islands.
This is a remarkable feature and a major attraction for the visitor. It is a natural rectangular shaped pool into which the sea ebbs and flow at the bottom of the cliffs south of Dún Aonghasa on Inis Mór. Access to it is gained by walking east along the cliffs from Dún Aonghasa or more easily by following the signs from the village of Gort na gCapall. It is also a Red Bull Cliff-diving site.
Poll na bPéist - The Wormhole
This is a remarkable feature and a major attraction for the visitor. It is a natural rectangular shaped pool into which the sea ebbs and flow at the bottom of the cliffs south of Dún Aonghasa on Inis Mór. Access to it is gained by walking east along the cliffs from Dún Aonghasa or more easily by following the signs from the village of Gort na gCapall. It is also a Red Bull Cliff-diving site.
The world renowned seven day Galway Races Summer Festival returns for its 150th year, from Monday 29th July to Sunday 4th August 2019. Galway continues to do what it has always done. It stirs the soul, makes our hearts beat that little bit faster and brings us together as families. The style, the entertainment, the sense of history and all the thrills of top-quality racing…thinking about it is enough to give you goose-bumps!
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Galway Races
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The world renowned seven day Galway Races Summer Festival returns for its 150th year, from Monday 29th July to Sunday 4th August 2019. Galway continues to do what it has always done. It stirs the soul, makes our hearts beat that little bit faster and brings us together as families. The style, the entertainment, the sense of history and all the thrills of top-quality racing…thinking about it is enough to give you goose-bumps!
The Cathedral of Our Lady Assumed into Heaven and St Nicholas (Irish language: Ard-Eaglais Mhaighdean na Deastógála agus Naomh Nioclás), commonly known as Galway Cathedral, is a Roman Catholic cathedral in Galway City, and one of its largest and most impressive buildings.. Construction began in 1958 on the site of the old city Gaol. It was completed in 1965, making it the last great stone cathedral to be built in Europe. It was dedicated, jointly, to Our Lady Assumed into Heaven and to St. Nicholas. The architect of the cathedral was John J. Robinson, who had previously designed many churches in Dublin and around the country. The architecture of the cathedral draws on many influences. The dome and pillars reflect a Renaissance style. Other features, including the rose windows and mosaics, echo the broad tradition of Christian art. The cathedral dome, at a height of 44.2 metres (145 ft), is a prominent landmark on the city skyline.
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Galway Cathedral
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The Cathedral of Our Lady Assumed into Heaven and St Nicholas (Irish language: Ard-Eaglais Mhaighdean na Deastógála agus Naomh Nioclás), commonly known as Galway Cathedral, is a Roman Catholic cathedral in Galway City, and one of its largest and most impressive buildings.. Construction began in 1958 on the site of the old city Gaol. It was completed in 1965, making it the last great stone cathedral to be built in Europe. It was dedicated, jointly, to Our Lady Assumed into Heaven and to St. Nicholas. The architect of the cathedral was John J. Robinson, who had previously designed many churches in Dublin and around the country. The architecture of the cathedral draws on many influences. The dome and pillars reflect a Renaissance style. Other features, including the rose windows and mosaics, echo the broad tradition of Christian art. The cathedral dome, at a height of 44.2 metres (145 ft), is a prominent landmark on the city skyline.
Connemara Isles Golf Club is situated on the brink of the Atlantic Ocean in the heart of the Gaeltacht. This unique island 9-hole course has some of the finest golf holes in the country. This distinctive island course offers a unique opportunity to play golf on the edge of the Atlantic ocean while enjoying the breathtaking views of Cill Chiaráin Bay, Cnoc Leitir Móir and Cnoc Mordáin. After the game, relax in the friendly atmosphere of Ireland’s only thatched club house and experience the magical beauty of the Irish language.
Connemara Isles Golf Club
Connemara Isles Golf Club is situated on the brink of the Atlantic Ocean in the heart of the Gaeltacht. This unique island 9-hole course has some of the finest golf holes in the country. This distinctive island course offers a unique opportunity to play golf on the edge of the Atlantic ocean while enjoying the breathtaking views of Cill Chiaráin Bay, Cnoc Leitir Móir and Cnoc Mordáin. After the game, relax in the friendly atmosphere of Ireland’s only thatched club house and experience the magical beauty of the Irish language.