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John’s guidebook

John

John’s guidebook

Sightseeing
The Cliffs of Moher is by far one of the most popular tourist destinations in Ireland, attracting over one million visitors each year. The Cliffs of Moher are approximately 14 km long, and they rise to 214 meters (just above 700ft) at their highest point, just north of O’Brien’s Tower.
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Cliffs of Moher
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Set on a 50 acre organic farm of wildflower meadows, fairy woodlands, limestone and a disappearing lake, Burren Nature Sanctuary is an ideal introduction to the magical Burren landscape. Situated in the picturesque village of Kinvara along the Wild Atlantic Way Burren Nature Sanctuary is a hidden gem as you travel from Galway or Dublin to the Cliffs of Moher. Visit the Botany Bubble home to the National Collection of Burren flora in season which showcases the unique and diverse Burren geology and flora where Alpine, Mediterranean, Arctic and tropical plants grow alongside native Irish wildflowers. Burren Nature Sanctuary has something for all ages. Find the fairy houses in the hazel woodland, meet the farm pets at feeding time, Burren mountain goats, donkeys, guinea pigs and rabbits. Solve the Bird Box Treasure Hunt or try the Burren Challenge Adventure play with zip wire, the indoor giant slide or soft-play area for toddlers. Explore the mile-long looped nature trail dotted with interpretive panels as it meanders through Burren habitats of karst limestone, ancient hazel and ash woodland. The orchid rich wildflower meadow grazed by Galloway cows and miniature ponies is home to majority of Ireland’s butterflies. The audio walking guide really brings the landscape to life. Discover fossils from ancient tropical seas in the limestone rocks formed over millions of years. Identify seasonal wild flowers growing in the spaces between the rocks. Stroll along the boreen, a grassy track lined with native Irish trees all the way to the turlough and unusual freshwater lake that disappears into limestone caves in time with the tides. Connect with nature, yourself and each other in the peace and tranquillity of this ancient landscape. Relax in the Sanctuary Café, enjoy freshly baked scones, tasty lunches and great coffee, our children’s menu offers no fizz, no fry and hidden vegetables. Browse the Avoca gift shop, local crafts.
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Burren Nature Sanctuary & Cafe
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Set on a 50 acre organic farm of wildflower meadows, fairy woodlands, limestone and a disappearing lake, Burren Nature Sanctuary is an ideal introduction to the magical Burren landscape. Situated in the picturesque village of Kinvara along the Wild Atlantic Way Burren Nature Sanctuary is a hidden gem as you travel from Galway or Dublin to the Cliffs of Moher. Visit the Botany Bubble home to the National Collection of Burren flora in season which showcases the unique and diverse Burren geology and flora where Alpine, Mediterranean, Arctic and tropical plants grow alongside native Irish wildflowers. Burren Nature Sanctuary has something for all ages. Find the fairy houses in the hazel woodland, meet the farm pets at feeding time, Burren mountain goats, donkeys, guinea pigs and rabbits. Solve the Bird Box Treasure Hunt or try the Burren Challenge Adventure play with zip wire, the indoor giant slide or soft-play area for toddlers. Explore the mile-long looped nature trail dotted with interpretive panels as it meanders through Burren habitats of karst limestone, ancient hazel and ash woodland. The orchid rich wildflower meadow grazed by Galloway cows and miniature ponies is home to majority of Ireland’s butterflies. The audio walking guide really brings the landscape to life. Discover fossils from ancient tropical seas in the limestone rocks formed over millions of years. Identify seasonal wild flowers growing in the spaces between the rocks. Stroll along the boreen, a grassy track lined with native Irish trees all the way to the turlough and unusual freshwater lake that disappears into limestone caves in time with the tides. Connect with nature, yourself and each other in the peace and tranquillity of this ancient landscape. Relax in the Sanctuary Café, enjoy freshly baked scones, tasty lunches and great coffee, our children’s menu offers no fizz, no fry and hidden vegetables. Browse the Avoca gift shop, local crafts.
The Burren region is internationally famous for its landscape and flora. A visit to the Burren during the summer months will leave a person amazed by the colourful diversity of flowering plants living together within the one ecosystem. Arctic-alpine plants living side by side with Mediterranean plants, calcicole (lime-loving) and calcifuge (acid-loving) plants growing adjacent to one another and woodland plants growing out in the open with not a tree nearby to provide shade from the sun. Also found here are certain species which although rare elsewhere are abundant in the Burren. Even more amazingly they all survive in a land that appears to be composed entirely of rock.The Burren covers 1% of the land surface of Ireland and is approximately 360 square kilometres in size. Most of the Burren is designated a Special Area of Conservation to protect this extremely unusual habitat. The Burren National Park is located in the southeastern corner of the Burren and is approximately 1500 hectares (15 square kilometres) in size. The Park land was bought by the Government for nature conservation and public access. It contains examples of all the major habitats within the Burren: Limestone Pavement, Calcareous grassland, Hazel scrub, Ash/hazel woodland, Turloughs, Lakes, Petrifying springs, Cliffs and Fen. In 1651 a Cromwellian Army Officer named Ludlow remarked: “of this barony it is said that it is a country where there is not water enough to drown a man, wood enough to hang one, nor earth enough to bury them. This last is so scarce that the inhabitants steal it from one another and yet their cattle are very fat. The grass grows in tufts of earth of two or three foot square which lies between the limestone rocks and is very sweet and nourishing.”
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Burren National Park Information Point
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The Burren region is internationally famous for its landscape and flora. A visit to the Burren during the summer months will leave a person amazed by the colourful diversity of flowering plants living together within the one ecosystem. Arctic-alpine plants living side by side with Mediterranean plants, calcicole (lime-loving) and calcifuge (acid-loving) plants growing adjacent to one another and woodland plants growing out in the open with not a tree nearby to provide shade from the sun. Also found here are certain species which although rare elsewhere are abundant in the Burren. Even more amazingly they all survive in a land that appears to be composed entirely of rock.The Burren covers 1% of the land surface of Ireland and is approximately 360 square kilometres in size. Most of the Burren is designated a Special Area of Conservation to protect this extremely unusual habitat. The Burren National Park is located in the southeastern corner of the Burren and is approximately 1500 hectares (15 square kilometres) in size. The Park land was bought by the Government for nature conservation and public access. It contains examples of all the major habitats within the Burren: Limestone Pavement, Calcareous grassland, Hazel scrub, Ash/hazel woodland, Turloughs, Lakes, Petrifying springs, Cliffs and Fen. In 1651 a Cromwellian Army Officer named Ludlow remarked: “of this barony it is said that it is a country where there is not water enough to drown a man, wood enough to hang one, nor earth enough to bury them. This last is so scarce that the inhabitants steal it from one another and yet their cattle are very fat. The grass grows in tufts of earth of two or three foot square which lies between the limestone rocks and is very sweet and nourishing.”
The Flaggy Shore is one of the most northerly parts of County Clare, stretching from the village of New Quay to Finvarra Point. The Flaggy Shore is one of nine sites of geological importance that form the basis of the Burren and Cliffs of Moher UNESCO Global Geopark. Famous for its limestone pavements, fossils embedded in the rock, including sculptured rocks along the shore called ‘biokarst’. A paved road runs along the shore making it ideal for walkers of all ability and age. Take some time to follow the Geopark Heritage trail of the Flaggy Shore and stroll through the local history. The Flaggy Shore is an ideal place to find clues about where the ancient ice sheets were and in what direction the glaciers moved. The clues can be be found by looking at the rocks along the shore and identifying the odd one out. Most of the cobbles and boulders along the shore are grey limestone rocks, but some are glacial erratics of other rock types, such as granite or sandstone.
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Flaggy Shore
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The Flaggy Shore is one of the most northerly parts of County Clare, stretching from the village of New Quay to Finvarra Point. The Flaggy Shore is one of nine sites of geological importance that form the basis of the Burren and Cliffs of Moher UNESCO Global Geopark. Famous for its limestone pavements, fossils embedded in the rock, including sculptured rocks along the shore called ‘biokarst’. A paved road runs along the shore making it ideal for walkers of all ability and age. Take some time to follow the Geopark Heritage trail of the Flaggy Shore and stroll through the local history. The Flaggy Shore is an ideal place to find clues about where the ancient ice sheets were and in what direction the glaciers moved. The clues can be be found by looking at the rocks along the shore and identifying the odd one out. Most of the cobbles and boulders along the shore are grey limestone rocks, but some are glacial erratics of other rock types, such as granite or sandstone.
The heritage town of Gort can be found in south County Galway, about 37km south of Galway city on the N18. Just outside the town of Gort, is where you’ll find the beautiful Coole Park, formerly the estate of Lady Gregory but now a 1,000 acre nature reserve. Coole Park estate was once the home of Lady Augusta Gregory who was pivotal to the Irish literary revival and was co-founder of the Abbey Theatre. Coole House was a focal point for many meetings about Irish literature which were attended by George Bernard Shaw, J.M. Synge, Sean O Casey and William Butler Yeats. Coole Park was often referred to in stories and poems eg. W.B Yeats was so inspired by the beauty and tranquillity here that he wrote a poem called “The Wild Swans at Coole”.The most unique features of Coole Park are the turloughs (seasonal lakes or also called disappearing lakes) which are said to be the best examples of turloughs in the world. The park is situated on a low lying karst area of land and due to this the park has been designated a Special Area of Conservation. As you stroll around Coole Park you’ll see different types of animals and mammals in their natural environments. Coole Park is also an important sanctuary for birds especially winter waterfowl. At Coole Park you’ll also find a very informative and educational Visitor’s Centre, which is well worth a visit. Here you can see audio-visual presentations about Lady Gregory herself and you’ll also see some exhibitions telling the story and history of Coole Park. The park is open all year round and there is free admission to the grounds, so it’s a great day out for the family. There’s also a restaurant on site if you want to enjoy a wide selection of traditional Irish dishes.
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Coole Park
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The heritage town of Gort can be found in south County Galway, about 37km south of Galway city on the N18. Just outside the town of Gort, is where you’ll find the beautiful Coole Park, formerly the estate of Lady Gregory but now a 1,000 acre nature reserve. Coole Park estate was once the home of Lady Augusta Gregory who was pivotal to the Irish literary revival and was co-founder of the Abbey Theatre. Coole House was a focal point for many meetings about Irish literature which were attended by George Bernard Shaw, J.M. Synge, Sean O Casey and William Butler Yeats. Coole Park was often referred to in stories and poems eg. W.B Yeats was so inspired by the beauty and tranquillity here that he wrote a poem called “The Wild Swans at Coole”.The most unique features of Coole Park are the turloughs (seasonal lakes or also called disappearing lakes) which are said to be the best examples of turloughs in the world. The park is situated on a low lying karst area of land and due to this the park has been designated a Special Area of Conservation. As you stroll around Coole Park you’ll see different types of animals and mammals in their natural environments. Coole Park is also an important sanctuary for birds especially winter waterfowl. At Coole Park you’ll also find a very informative and educational Visitor’s Centre, which is well worth a visit. Here you can see audio-visual presentations about Lady Gregory herself and you’ll also see some exhibitions telling the story and history of Coole Park. The park is open all year round and there is free admission to the grounds, so it’s a great day out for the family. There’s also a restaurant on site if you want to enjoy a wide selection of traditional Irish dishes.
Situated in the West of Ireland in County Galway, Connemara National Park covers some 2,957 hectares of scenic mountains, expanses of bogs, heaths, grasslands and woodlands. Some of the park's mountains, namely Benbaun, Bencullagh, Benbrack and Muckanaght, are part of the famous Twelve Bens or Beanna Beola range. A number of walking trails beginning at the Visitor Centre offer walkers a variety of scenic routes and nature trails through the park. Stunning vistas from the 400-metre high Diamond Hill include the distant islands of Inishbofin, Inishturk and Inishshark, and the turreted Kylemore Abbey. The park is also home to Connemara ponies, red deer and an enormous variety of bird-life, including skylarks, stonechats and peregrine falcons. Other remnants of times past include ruined houses, a disused lime kiln, old sheep pens, an ice house, ancient walls and Tobar Mweelin, a well which was formerly used to supply water to Kylemore Castle. The Visitor Centre features include exhibitions, the ‘Man and the landscape’ multi-lingual audio visual show and tea room (seasonal). Entrance to the Visitor Centre is free of charge. A summer programme of guided walks and special events for younger visitors are also available at the Visitor Centre.
Connemara National Park Visitor Centre
Situated in the West of Ireland in County Galway, Connemara National Park covers some 2,957 hectares of scenic mountains, expanses of bogs, heaths, grasslands and woodlands. Some of the park's mountains, namely Benbaun, Bencullagh, Benbrack and Muckanaght, are part of the famous Twelve Bens or Beanna Beola range. A number of walking trails beginning at the Visitor Centre offer walkers a variety of scenic routes and nature trails through the park. Stunning vistas from the 400-metre high Diamond Hill include the distant islands of Inishbofin, Inishturk and Inishshark, and the turreted Kylemore Abbey. The park is also home to Connemara ponies, red deer and an enormous variety of bird-life, including skylarks, stonechats and peregrine falcons. Other remnants of times past include ruined houses, a disused lime kiln, old sheep pens, an ice house, ancient walls and Tobar Mweelin, a well which was formerly used to supply water to Kylemore Castle. The Visitor Centre features include exhibitions, the ‘Man and the landscape’ multi-lingual audio visual show and tea room (seasonal). Entrance to the Visitor Centre is free of charge. A summer programme of guided walks and special events for younger visitors are also available at the Visitor Centre.
The Aillwee Cave is one of the many caves beneath the Burren. It was formed by glacial melt waters that seeped through the cracks in the limestone pavement during an early ice-age. It is the oldest cave in the Burren at 1.5 million years old, and boasts some of the most spectacular stalactites and stalagmites in Ireland . The powerful flow of these melt waters eroded through the rock, forming a subterranean river. Since the last ice-age, this river has subsided, leaving in its place one of Ireland ’s most spectacular caves. The largest area in the cave is known as The Highway, which is located at the centre of the cave. The cave was inhabited by animals for thousands of years before it was discovered by man. Hibernation pits dug out by bears were found in the cave, as well as bones of a brown bear. Bears are no longer found in Ireland , and have been extinct here for over 1,000 years.
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Aillwee Cave
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The Aillwee Cave is one of the many caves beneath the Burren. It was formed by glacial melt waters that seeped through the cracks in the limestone pavement during an early ice-age. It is the oldest cave in the Burren at 1.5 million years old, and boasts some of the most spectacular stalactites and stalagmites in Ireland . The powerful flow of these melt waters eroded through the rock, forming a subterranean river. Since the last ice-age, this river has subsided, leaving in its place one of Ireland ’s most spectacular caves. The largest area in the cave is known as The Highway, which is located at the centre of the cave. The cave was inhabited by animals for thousands of years before it was discovered by man. Hibernation pits dug out by bears were found in the cave, as well as bones of a brown bear. Bears are no longer found in Ireland , and have been extinct here for over 1,000 years.
The Aran Islands are located in the middle of the Wild Atlantic Way. They are reached by Ferry from Rossaveal (which is the port when coming from Connemara & Galway). The Aran Islands are also accessible by Ferry from Doolin which is close to the Cliffs of Moher in County Clare. There is also a small flight service to the Aran Islands.Famed for their wild landscapes, distinctive knitted jumpers and pretty thatched cottages, the Irish-speaking Aran Islands on Ireland’s Wild Atlantic Way never fail to wow… Located 48km (30 miles) off the County Galway coastline and surrounded by the Atlantic, the cluster of three islands known as the Arans are celebrated for their heritage, culture and arresting landscapes. Crossing the fathomless, grey-blue sea towards them feels like entering a different dimension. These lands have a startling and often harsh beauty that has drawn poets, artists, dreamers and adventurers for thousands of years. Your Aran Islands adventure starts with a trip by passenger ferry from Rossaveal, County Galway or Doolin, County Clare. You can also get there by air in just 8 minutes! Island-hop between the three, rent bicycles and explore the hidden corners, ancient sites and enduring traditions. Travel one, or make it your business to visit all three – the choice is yours.
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Inishmore
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The Aran Islands are located in the middle of the Wild Atlantic Way. They are reached by Ferry from Rossaveal (which is the port when coming from Connemara & Galway). The Aran Islands are also accessible by Ferry from Doolin which is close to the Cliffs of Moher in County Clare. There is also a small flight service to the Aran Islands.Famed for their wild landscapes, distinctive knitted jumpers and pretty thatched cottages, the Irish-speaking Aran Islands on Ireland’s Wild Atlantic Way never fail to wow… Located 48km (30 miles) off the County Galway coastline and surrounded by the Atlantic, the cluster of three islands known as the Arans are celebrated for their heritage, culture and arresting landscapes. Crossing the fathomless, grey-blue sea towards them feels like entering a different dimension. These lands have a startling and often harsh beauty that has drawn poets, artists, dreamers and adventurers for thousands of years. Your Aran Islands adventure starts with a trip by passenger ferry from Rossaveal, County Galway or Doolin, County Clare. You can also get there by air in just 8 minutes! Island-hop between the three, rent bicycles and explore the hidden corners, ancient sites and enduring traditions. Travel one, or make it your business to visit all three – the choice is yours.
Food scene
Galway City is a thriving, bohemian, cultural city on the western coast of Ireland. Along with being a popular seaside destination with beautiful beaches and long winding promenade, it also has a buzzing cosmopolitan city centre. The city is a joy to explore with its labyrinthine cobbled streets, colourful shop facades and busy café/ bar culture. The city is also well known for its many festivals throughout the year with huge crowds gathering for the annual Galway Arts Festival, Races and numerous other events. Old Ireland is present too with turf fires and traditional music featuring in many pubs to compliment your enjoyment of a well earned pint of Guinness. Take an evening stroll along the promenade and watch the sunset over Galway Bay or watch the salmon fishermen in the River Corrib from the perfect vantage point of the Salmon Weir Bridge.
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Galway
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Galway City is a thriving, bohemian, cultural city on the western coast of Ireland. Along with being a popular seaside destination with beautiful beaches and long winding promenade, it also has a buzzing cosmopolitan city centre. The city is a joy to explore with its labyrinthine cobbled streets, colourful shop facades and busy café/ bar culture. The city is also well known for its many festivals throughout the year with huge crowds gathering for the annual Galway Arts Festival, Races and numerous other events. Old Ireland is present too with turf fires and traditional music featuring in many pubs to compliment your enjoyment of a well earned pint of Guinness. Take an evening stroll along the promenade and watch the sunset over Galway Bay or watch the salmon fishermen in the River Corrib from the perfect vantage point of the Salmon Weir Bridge.
Restauraunt overlooking kinvara bay
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The Pier Head Bar & Restaurant
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Restauraunt overlooking kinvara bay
We make perfumes and cosmetics using natural and organic ingredients. We take our inspiration from the landscape around us. Everything is made by hand, on site, in the Burren. We have a free audiovisual presentation on the flora and fauna of the Burren for you to enjoy when you visit. Relax in the rose-covered Tea Rooms, which serve a mouth watering selection of organic cakes, scones and pies. Homemade soups with freshly baked bread, selections of local cheeses and salads all made with organic vegetables...
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The Burren Perfumery
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We make perfumes and cosmetics using natural and organic ingredients. We take our inspiration from the landscape around us. Everything is made by hand, on site, in the Burren. We have a free audiovisual presentation on the flora and fauna of the Burren for you to enjoy when you visit. Relax in the rose-covered Tea Rooms, which serve a mouth watering selection of organic cakes, scones and pies. Homemade soups with freshly baked bread, selections of local cheeses and salads all made with organic vegetables...
review from Irish Examiner newspaper Gregan’s is not an actual castle but an 18th century manor house and boutique hotel. Mickael Viljanen of Greenhouse cooked here for a time and made it into a destination, but that seems like an age ago – Gregan’s has been about David Hurley’s food for a long time now.A quick scene-setting: the dining room is comfortable and welcoming in warm green tones with a fine view of the Burren, service is welcoming, punctilious and effortless. The menu here has five sections with choices in three of those, but lots of extras are added so this has the feel of a tasting menu but one that (crucially) gives diners some control. Hurley takes the local (where possible) and finds ways for these ingredients to shine by whatever means necessary. Discs of pickled local carrots are given a cardamom mousse to soften and broaden the alkaline kick, a powerful umami pop is created when Irish bacon gets matched with brie and truffle and served into a tiny cone (just for fun), and plain old scallop roe is mixed with squid ink and made into a sweet-savoury meringue and sits on identically coloured black stones. That was just our amuse bouche and it woke up all our senses – from the eye-popping beauty of presentation to the crunch of the cones and the meringue to the bursts of aroma, flavour and textures – we were now utterly focused on our dinner, not on the view. The wine list is broad and of decent length with very fair pricing and I like that it concentrates its efforts on wines priced between €30 and €50, you know, the kind of wines you are likely to buy. A glass of biodynamic Fleury Champagne for the Engineer (birthday girl) was rich and elegant and almost a steal at €17 per glass. Fosso del Nibbio 2012, an organic 100% Sangiovese from Montecucco in Southern Tuscany was chosen purely because I had never heard of it – this is a list you can trust. It was stunningly good – packed with limpid red cherry fruits yet taut, complex and savoury, the bottle age had allowed every one of its million flavours to meld into something other – something grand. And it cost just €34.
Gregans Castle Hotel
review from Irish Examiner newspaper Gregan’s is not an actual castle but an 18th century manor house and boutique hotel. Mickael Viljanen of Greenhouse cooked here for a time and made it into a destination, but that seems like an age ago – Gregan’s has been about David Hurley’s food for a long time now.A quick scene-setting: the dining room is comfortable and welcoming in warm green tones with a fine view of the Burren, service is welcoming, punctilious and effortless. The menu here has five sections with choices in three of those, but lots of extras are added so this has the feel of a tasting menu but one that (crucially) gives diners some control. Hurley takes the local (where possible) and finds ways for these ingredients to shine by whatever means necessary. Discs of pickled local carrots are given a cardamom mousse to soften and broaden the alkaline kick, a powerful umami pop is created when Irish bacon gets matched with brie and truffle and served into a tiny cone (just for fun), and plain old scallop roe is mixed with squid ink and made into a sweet-savoury meringue and sits on identically coloured black stones. That was just our amuse bouche and it woke up all our senses – from the eye-popping beauty of presentation to the crunch of the cones and the meringue to the bursts of aroma, flavour and textures – we were now utterly focused on our dinner, not on the view. The wine list is broad and of decent length with very fair pricing and I like that it concentrates its efforts on wines priced between €30 and €50, you know, the kind of wines you are likely to buy. A glass of biodynamic Fleury Champagne for the Engineer (birthday girl) was rich and elegant and almost a steal at €17 per glass. Fosso del Nibbio 2012, an organic 100% Sangiovese from Montecucco in Southern Tuscany was chosen purely because I had never heard of it – this is a list you can trust. It was stunningly good – packed with limpid red cherry fruits yet taut, complex and savoury, the bottle age had allowed every one of its million flavours to meld into something other – something grand. And it cost just €34.
This historic, family run pub and restaurant in the heart of the Burren offers a varied menu of top quality, locally- sourced food with several local dishes unique to Cassidy’s – including Burren Mionain (mountain goat). It is the only pub and restaurant business in Ireland run consistently by the same family for the last 200 years. The pub is located in a former British Police (RIC) Barracks and overlooks more than 4000 acres of unique Burren landscape including the largest Turlough (disappearing lake)in Europe. The award winning menu is focused on affordable quality with an emphasis on family dining. All food is freshly prepared on the premises and supplied by local farmers and fishermen and the beef is from the restaurant’s own Shorthorn Herd (Irish breed). Be sure you don’t miss the restaurant’s fantastic selection of home-made desserts – they’re legendary in the Burren area.
Cassidys Pub and Restaurant
This historic, family run pub and restaurant in the heart of the Burren offers a varied menu of top quality, locally- sourced food with several local dishes unique to Cassidy’s – including Burren Mionain (mountain goat). It is the only pub and restaurant business in Ireland run consistently by the same family for the last 200 years. The pub is located in a former British Police (RIC) Barracks and overlooks more than 4000 acres of unique Burren landscape including the largest Turlough (disappearing lake)in Europe. The award winning menu is focused on affordable quality with an emphasis on family dining. All food is freshly prepared on the premises and supplied by local farmers and fishermen and the beef is from the restaurant’s own Shorthorn Herd (Irish breed). Be sure you don’t miss the restaurant’s fantastic selection of home-made desserts – they’re legendary in the Burren area.
Dunguaire Castle has stood proudly on the site of the 7th-century stronghold of Guaire, the King of Connaught, for centuries. This majestic castle bridges 13 centuries of Irish history, from skirmishes, battles and sieges, through to the literary revival of the early 20th century. Oliver St. John Gogarty surgeon, poet, author and wit, a contemporary and friend of W.B. Yeats and Lady Gregory, acquired the Castle as a place of quiet retreat in 1924. Today the Castle provides an insight into the lifestyle of its inhabitants from 1520 to modern times. Dunguaire also hosts evening medieval banquets and entertainment, featuring extracts from literary greats such as Synge, Yeats, Shaw and O’Casey. If you’ve enjoyed reading about Dunguaire Castle you might like to know more about Dunguaire Castle Banquet. See more at www.shannonheritage.com
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Dunguaire Castle
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Dunguaire Castle has stood proudly on the site of the 7th-century stronghold of Guaire, the King of Connaught, for centuries. This majestic castle bridges 13 centuries of Irish history, from skirmishes, battles and sieges, through to the literary revival of the early 20th century. Oliver St. John Gogarty surgeon, poet, author and wit, a contemporary and friend of W.B. Yeats and Lady Gregory, acquired the Castle as a place of quiet retreat in 1924. Today the Castle provides an insight into the lifestyle of its inhabitants from 1520 to modern times. Dunguaire also hosts evening medieval banquets and entertainment, featuring extracts from literary greats such as Synge, Yeats, Shaw and O’Casey. If you’ve enjoyed reading about Dunguaire Castle you might like to know more about Dunguaire Castle Banquet. See more at www.shannonheritage.com
Our boutique bean to bar chocolate factory is amongst the smallest and most remote chocolate factories in the world, situated next to our cafe in the Burren hills. Since its conception in 2014, Hazel Mountain chocolate has been making waves on the chocolate scene, with a TV appearance with Nigella Lawson, and a bronze award from the Academy of chocolate. Our process is unique in Ireland in that we complete every stage from the bean to the bar on site. We create small batches of chocolate made from criollo and Trinitario beans attained through direct trade. Our award winning single origin dark chocolate is beautiful in its simplicity, being formed from beans including Madagascar, Venezuelan, Mexican and Costa Rican mixed solely with raw cane sugar. Our luxuriously creamy milk chocolate is created using Irish milk from grass fed cows, amalgamated with a very smooth cuban bean. Our process includes roasting the beans, cracking and winnowing, before grinding the cocoa nibs in our stone mills in the traditional method for two days, all before ageing the chocolate for 3 weeks. Due to the open floor plan of our shop and factory, the entire process, including the chocolate kitchen, is viewable by all who pass through our gates. From the smell of the roasted beans through the factory door, to the tasting of Ireland’s finest craft chocolate, our quaint little factory is a unique experience you don’t want to miss.
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Hazel Mountain Chocolate
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Our boutique bean to bar chocolate factory is amongst the smallest and most remote chocolate factories in the world, situated next to our cafe in the Burren hills. Since its conception in 2014, Hazel Mountain chocolate has been making waves on the chocolate scene, with a TV appearance with Nigella Lawson, and a bronze award from the Academy of chocolate. Our process is unique in Ireland in that we complete every stage from the bean to the bar on site. We create small batches of chocolate made from criollo and Trinitario beans attained through direct trade. Our award winning single origin dark chocolate is beautiful in its simplicity, being formed from beans including Madagascar, Venezuelan, Mexican and Costa Rican mixed solely with raw cane sugar. Our luxuriously creamy milk chocolate is created using Irish milk from grass fed cows, amalgamated with a very smooth cuban bean. Our process includes roasting the beans, cracking and winnowing, before grinding the cocoa nibs in our stone mills in the traditional method for two days, all before ageing the chocolate for 3 weeks. Due to the open floor plan of our shop and factory, the entire process, including the chocolate kitchen, is viewable by all who pass through our gates. From the smell of the roasted beans through the factory door, to the tasting of Ireland’s finest craft chocolate, our quaint little factory is a unique experience you don’t want to miss.
Friday is an opportunity to sample local organic produce at our local market,there is also arts and crafts from local artists.
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Kinvara Farmers' Market
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Friday is an opportunity to sample local organic produce at our local market,there is also arts and crafts from local artists.
Historical
Poulnabrone – Geosite Situated on the high Burren limestone plateau, Poulnabrone Dolmen is one of Ireland’s most iconic archaeological monuments and is the second most visited location in the Burren after the Cliffs of Moher. It is the oldest dated megalithic monument in Ireland. Portal Tomb Poulnabrone is classified as a portal tomb. Portal tombs have two large portal stones standing on either side of an entrance capped with a massive sloping capstone. A second stone which lies on the ground at the rear of the monument was likely a second capstone which would have fitted in under the main capstone and covered the back of the structure. This part collapsed at some unknown time in the past. The tomb was built on limestone pavement and surrounded by a low mound of rocks. This mound of rocks would have added support to the upright stones which are otherwise only supported by the weight of the capstone. The uprights are not wedged into the deep fissures which are common in the limestone. The limestone flagstones which were used to build the monument would have been extracted from the surrounding limestone pavement. Archaeology Excavations by archaeologist Anne Lynch in the 1980’s revealed the remains of 21 people in the main tomb chamber and radiocarbon dating of their bones indicates that the tomb was in continual use for a period of 600 years between 5,200 and 5,800 years ago. The bones show signs of wear that suggests hard physical labour was normal for the people of the time and while one hip bone had the tip of an arrow head embedded in it indicating conflict, there is also evidence of creativity and craftsmanship shown in the discovery of a decorated neck pendant.
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Poulnabrone Dolmen
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Poulnabrone – Geosite Situated on the high Burren limestone plateau, Poulnabrone Dolmen is one of Ireland’s most iconic archaeological monuments and is the second most visited location in the Burren after the Cliffs of Moher. It is the oldest dated megalithic monument in Ireland. Portal Tomb Poulnabrone is classified as a portal tomb. Portal tombs have two large portal stones standing on either side of an entrance capped with a massive sloping capstone. A second stone which lies on the ground at the rear of the monument was likely a second capstone which would have fitted in under the main capstone and covered the back of the structure. This part collapsed at some unknown time in the past. The tomb was built on limestone pavement and surrounded by a low mound of rocks. This mound of rocks would have added support to the upright stones which are otherwise only supported by the weight of the capstone. The uprights are not wedged into the deep fissures which are common in the limestone. The limestone flagstones which were used to build the monument would have been extracted from the surrounding limestone pavement. Archaeology Excavations by archaeologist Anne Lynch in the 1980’s revealed the remains of 21 people in the main tomb chamber and radiocarbon dating of their bones indicates that the tomb was in continual use for a period of 600 years between 5,200 and 5,800 years ago. The bones show signs of wear that suggests hard physical labour was normal for the people of the time and while one hip bone had the tip of an arrow head embedded in it indicating conflict, there is also evidence of creativity and craftsmanship shown in the discovery of a decorated neck pendant.
Engage with Ancient Archaeology in Ireland at Caherconnell Stone Fort At Caherconnell, there is so much to do. Explore our ancient Irish ring forts or experience our past first hand at our Archaeology Field School. Caherconnell Stone Fort is also home to The Burren's leading sheepdog demonstrations which attract visitors from all over the globe. Delve into the intrigues of prehistoric Irish Bronze Age burial boulders and mounds, ancient Irish field systems, prehistoric dwelling sites and many stone cahers (ring forts). Caherconnell Stone Fort – The Burren’s Premier Tourist Attraction Located on the western edge of Ireland in the famous Burren region of County Clare, the deep archaeological heritage, breath-taking landscape and the warm and friendly people of Clare make Caherconnell Stone Fort a truly unique destination. In association with National University of Ireland, Galway, Caherconnell now offers a range of Archaeology and Geology Field School courses. Study Archaeology at our World-Famous Field School Excavate a 10th-century AD royal settlement and study ancient artefacts at our Archaeology Field School with courses running throughout the summer. Contact us today on +353 65 7089999 or send us an email at: info@caherconnell.com Discover a distinctive ancient Irish ring fort with a difference. We offer you an opportunity to visit a stunningly unspoiled piece of ancient Ireland in the heart of the Wild Atlantic Way.
Caherconnell
Engage with Ancient Archaeology in Ireland at Caherconnell Stone Fort At Caherconnell, there is so much to do. Explore our ancient Irish ring forts or experience our past first hand at our Archaeology Field School. Caherconnell Stone Fort is also home to The Burren's leading sheepdog demonstrations which attract visitors from all over the globe. Delve into the intrigues of prehistoric Irish Bronze Age burial boulders and mounds, ancient Irish field systems, prehistoric dwelling sites and many stone cahers (ring forts). Caherconnell Stone Fort – The Burren’s Premier Tourist Attraction Located on the western edge of Ireland in the famous Burren region of County Clare, the deep archaeological heritage, breath-taking landscape and the warm and friendly people of Clare make Caherconnell Stone Fort a truly unique destination. In association with National University of Ireland, Galway, Caherconnell now offers a range of Archaeology and Geology Field School courses. Study Archaeology at our World-Famous Field School Excavate a 10th-century AD royal settlement and study ancient artefacts at our Archaeology Field School with courses running throughout the summer. Contact us today on +353 65 7089999 or send us an email at: info@caherconnell.com Discover a distinctive ancient Irish ring fort with a difference. We offer you an opportunity to visit a stunningly unspoiled piece of ancient Ireland in the heart of the Wild Atlantic Way.
relands iconic Bunratty Castle is a must on your itinerary to Ireland. Named after the river Raite which runs alongside this strategic battlement. The spot on which this castle stands has been occupied for over 1000 years. From the Vikings to the Normans, great Irish Earls and noble Lords and Ladies. Graciously restored in the 1960's and furnished by Lord Gorts magnificent collection of medieval furniture and furnishings, this is your chance to experience a window on Ireland’s past and explore the acclaimed 15th century Bunratty Castle. *Last Entry to Folk Park is 16:30 and last entry to Bunratty Castle is 16:00
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Bunratty Castle & Folk Park
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relands iconic Bunratty Castle is a must on your itinerary to Ireland. Named after the river Raite which runs alongside this strategic battlement. The spot on which this castle stands has been occupied for over 1000 years. From the Vikings to the Normans, great Irish Earls and noble Lords and Ladies. Graciously restored in the 1960's and furnished by Lord Gorts magnificent collection of medieval furniture and furnishings, this is your chance to experience a window on Ireland’s past and explore the acclaimed 15th century Bunratty Castle. *Last Entry to Folk Park is 16:30 and last entry to Bunratty Castle is 16:00
Kilmacduagh sits at the edge of the Burren, dominating the rural landscape some 5km south-west of Gort, in Co. Galway. In the medieval period, it was the most important church of the Uí Fiachrach Aidhne, a powerful local dynasty who held lands that stretched from the Atlantic coast to the mountains of the Burren and Slieve Aughty. By the twelfth century, Kilmacduagh had an enclosed settlement with the main church at the centre, at least three subsidiary churches, a round tower, the grave of the founder, Cólmán mac Duach, and a well dedicated to him. The settlement was transformed when the main church was enlarged as a cathedral and a monastery for Augustinian canons was established in the thirteenth century.At over 34 metres in height, Ireland's tallest round tower totally dominates the monastic complex at Kilmacduagh. We could see the tower from a good distance away as we approached the site. This rather unique monument has a number of very distinctive features. There are a total of 11 angle-headed windows present in the tower, some of which have been restored. Probably the most obvious feature of the tower is the very noticeable lean, over 1/2 metre, towards the south-west.
Kilmacduagh Abbey
Kilmacduagh sits at the edge of the Burren, dominating the rural landscape some 5km south-west of Gort, in Co. Galway. In the medieval period, it was the most important church of the Uí Fiachrach Aidhne, a powerful local dynasty who held lands that stretched from the Atlantic coast to the mountains of the Burren and Slieve Aughty. By the twelfth century, Kilmacduagh had an enclosed settlement with the main church at the centre, at least three subsidiary churches, a round tower, the grave of the founder, Cólmán mac Duach, and a well dedicated to him. The settlement was transformed when the main church was enlarged as a cathedral and a monastery for Augustinian canons was established in the thirteenth century.At over 34 metres in height, Ireland's tallest round tower totally dominates the monastic complex at Kilmacduagh. We could see the tower from a good distance away as we approached the site. This rather unique monument has a number of very distinctive features. There are a total of 11 angle-headed windows present in the tower, some of which have been restored. Probably the most obvious feature of the tower is the very noticeable lean, over 1/2 metre, towards the south-west.
Come and visit the Hiberno-Norman tower, with its fourteenth century stones and intimate living spaces so closely associated with the poet WB Yeats. Walk the narrow bridge and crossing stones, admire the gardens and river, view Yeats’s pear trees, one ‘broken by a storm’ as in his poem ‘Meditations in Time of Civil War’, and now, once again, enter into the sacred ground of tower and cottage. There you can climb the famous winding stair, stride the battlements and view the countryside, experience our immersive exhibitions exploring the poet’s art, his connection with the west, and his life and loves, attend our cultural events programme, shop for books and momentos, and take a cup of tea by our roaring fire. For more on the tower’s history, click here. Every year the tower is open between Spring and Autumn; occasionally, too, earlier and later, or at other times for special events. Due to weather conditions the interior of Thoor Ballylee is closed for the winter months, although the tower, bridge, river, grounds, and garden are still a moving place of pilgrimage to visit. You can walk up the stream to the old mill, picture Yeats’s wife George fishing from the tower windows, and of course use our year-round car park & facilities. In Summer 2015 thanks to our volunteers and supporters Thoor Ballylee was opened for the first time in many years between June and September. For Yeats’s 151st birthday in June 2016 our new Yeats Thoor Ballylee Exhibition was opened by the actress Sabina Coyle Higgins. In 2017 Thoor Ballylee reopened with its wonderful exhibitions and full programme of cultural events throughout the summer, and 2018 was packed full of even more. The 2019 season kicks off on Saturday 20th April, and features the opening of our new studio space 3pm Sunday 28th April. Come along anytime all summer to find out what Yeats’s tower has to offer!
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Thoor Ballylee Yeats Tower
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Come and visit the Hiberno-Norman tower, with its fourteenth century stones and intimate living spaces so closely associated with the poet WB Yeats. Walk the narrow bridge and crossing stones, admire the gardens and river, view Yeats’s pear trees, one ‘broken by a storm’ as in his poem ‘Meditations in Time of Civil War’, and now, once again, enter into the sacred ground of tower and cottage. There you can climb the famous winding stair, stride the battlements and view the countryside, experience our immersive exhibitions exploring the poet’s art, his connection with the west, and his life and loves, attend our cultural events programme, shop for books and momentos, and take a cup of tea by our roaring fire. For more on the tower’s history, click here. Every year the tower is open between Spring and Autumn; occasionally, too, earlier and later, or at other times for special events. Due to weather conditions the interior of Thoor Ballylee is closed for the winter months, although the tower, bridge, river, grounds, and garden are still a moving place of pilgrimage to visit. You can walk up the stream to the old mill, picture Yeats’s wife George fishing from the tower windows, and of course use our year-round car park & facilities. In Summer 2015 thanks to our volunteers and supporters Thoor Ballylee was opened for the first time in many years between June and September. For Yeats’s 151st birthday in June 2016 our new Yeats Thoor Ballylee Exhibition was opened by the actress Sabina Coyle Higgins. In 2017 Thoor Ballylee reopened with its wonderful exhibitions and full programme of cultural events throughout the summer, and 2018 was packed full of even more. The 2019 season kicks off on Saturday 20th April, and features the opening of our new studio space 3pm Sunday 28th April. Come along anytime all summer to find out what Yeats’s tower has to offer!
Welcome to Craggaunowen – the Living Past Experience. Ireland’s original award winning Pre-historic Park. Come and explore the roots of the people, homesteads, animals and artifacts of our Celtic ancestors of over 1,000 years ago which have touched and shaped how we live today. At Craggaunowen you gain a fascinating insight into how the Celts made their homes on a Crannog. Crannogs were found in Ireland during the Iron Age and early Christian periods. Though some homesteads were inhabited during the Late Bronze Age and in some cases were still being occupied as late as the 17th century. Another important attraction at Craggaunowen is the 'Brendan Boat', the hide boat in which Tim Severin sailed from Ireland to the United States. St. Brendan the Navigator (who died c. 583 AD.) was, according to a 9th century manuscript, “The Navigacio”, the first man to discover the 'Promised Land' across the Atlantic. This place he called High Basil and it first came to him a dream.
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Craggaunowen
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Welcome to Craggaunowen – the Living Past Experience. Ireland’s original award winning Pre-historic Park. Come and explore the roots of the people, homesteads, animals and artifacts of our Celtic ancestors of over 1,000 years ago which have touched and shaped how we live today. At Craggaunowen you gain a fascinating insight into how the Celts made their homes on a Crannog. Crannogs were found in Ireland during the Iron Age and early Christian periods. Though some homesteads were inhabited during the Late Bronze Age and in some cases were still being occupied as late as the 17th century. Another important attraction at Craggaunowen is the 'Brendan Boat', the hide boat in which Tim Severin sailed from Ireland to the United States. St. Brendan the Navigator (who died c. 583 AD.) was, according to a 9th century manuscript, “The Navigacio”, the first man to discover the 'Promised Land' across the Atlantic. This place he called High Basil and it first came to him a dream.
Beach
Traught is a rural beach located in a Special Area of Conservation (SAC) called the Galway Bay Complex. It is a gently sloping sandy beach suitable for families with young children. The beach is lifeguarded during the bathing season and more information can be found on the notice boards located at the beach. This beach has received the International Blue Flag award for 2019.
Tracht
Traught is a rural beach located in a Special Area of Conservation (SAC) called the Galway Bay Complex. It is a gently sloping sandy beach suitable for families with young children. The beach is lifeguarded during the bathing season and more information can be found on the notice boards located at the beach. This beach has received the International Blue Flag award for 2019.
Fanore Beach is on the northwest coast of the Burren and its golden arc of sand with the backdrop of bare limestone hill make this a very distinctive Geosite. This Geosite contains a sand dune complex, the only surface river that flows over the Burren limestone, the oldest archaeological remains in the Burren as well as spectacular biokarst and fossiliferous limestone.
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Fanore Beach
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Fanore Beach is on the northwest coast of the Burren and its golden arc of sand with the backdrop of bare limestone hill make this a very distinctive Geosite. This Geosite contains a sand dune complex, the only surface river that flows over the Burren limestone, the oldest archaeological remains in the Burren as well as spectacular biokarst and fossiliferous limestone.
Lahinch Beach is located a short drive from the Cliffs of Moher and is therefore very popular with locals and tourists alike. The flooding tide makes it ideal for surfing, sea kayaking and kite surfing and there are a few surfing schools in the local area. Lahinch is a popular resort town with many restaurants and accommodation. The beach is lifeguarded during the bathing season and more information can be found on the noticeboard located at the beach. This beach has received the International Blue Flag award for 2019.
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Lahinch Beach
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Lahinch Beach is located a short drive from the Cliffs of Moher and is therefore very popular with locals and tourists alike. The flooding tide makes it ideal for surfing, sea kayaking and kite surfing and there are a few surfing schools in the local area. Lahinch is a popular resort town with many restaurants and accommodation. The beach is lifeguarded during the bathing season and more information can be found on the noticeboard located at the beach. This beach has received the International Blue Flag award for 2019.
Golf
Lahinch is hosting the Irish open in July 2019 It has been described as ‘The St Andrews of Ireland’ and many other complimentary titles. Those who know and love the place firmly believe that Lahinch Golf Club doesn’t need comparison with any of the game’s other world class venues. From the infant days back in 1892 up to its 125th anniversary, the Club has stood out on its own merits as a golfing institution like none other. Lahinch Golf Club is renowned for the way the links has retained all of its old virtues. It has benefited from the willingness, over the decades, to move with the times and is now regarded as one of the best and most enjoyable challenges to be found anywhere in the golfing world. The legendary Old Tom Morris set the highest standards for the course from the outset. He was followed by equally celebrated architects Charles ‘Mo’ Gibson and Dr Alister MacKenzie. In more recent times, the expertise of Dr Martin Hawtree ensures its place in the higher echelons of all golf rankings. Lahinch is a remarkable club whose growth, vibrancy and spirit are charted in the pages of its centenary publication – 125 Years of Golf at Lahinch.
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Lahinch Golf Club
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Lahinch is hosting the Irish open in July 2019 It has been described as ‘The St Andrews of Ireland’ and many other complimentary titles. Those who know and love the place firmly believe that Lahinch Golf Club doesn’t need comparison with any of the game’s other world class venues. From the infant days back in 1892 up to its 125th anniversary, the Club has stood out on its own merits as a golfing institution like none other. Lahinch Golf Club is renowned for the way the links has retained all of its old virtues. It has benefited from the willingness, over the decades, to move with the times and is now regarded as one of the best and most enjoyable challenges to be found anywhere in the golfing world. The legendary Old Tom Morris set the highest standards for the course from the outset. He was followed by equally celebrated architects Charles ‘Mo’ Gibson and Dr Alister MacKenzie. In more recent times, the expertise of Dr Martin Hawtree ensures its place in the higher echelons of all golf rankings. Lahinch is a remarkable club whose growth, vibrancy and spirit are charted in the pages of its centenary publication – 125 Years of Golf at Lahinch.
Designed by Ryder Cup star, Christy O' Connor Junior, and officially opened in August 1996, Gort Golf Club is an 18 Hole Championship Golf Course, set in 160 acres of picturesque parkland on the edge of the world famous Burren. The course lies within 200 yards of the historic monastic settlement of Kilmacduagh. Christy Jnr., himself was particularly excited by the new course at Gort, where he regards, the four Par 3's as among the best on offer at any course in Ireland. His equally famous uncle, Christy Senior and his good friends Eamonn Darcy and Des Smyth were loud in their praise of both the course and the club house. Having designed many Golf Courses, in Ireland and abroad, this project took me to one of the most beautiful settings in Ireland, nestled by the famous Burren and overlooking Coole Park, the home place of Lady Gregory. I started to construct what I believe will be a very fine 18 Hole Golf Course, carved through the Burren stone and natural waterways.
Gort Golf Club
Designed by Ryder Cup star, Christy O' Connor Junior, and officially opened in August 1996, Gort Golf Club is an 18 Hole Championship Golf Course, set in 160 acres of picturesque parkland on the edge of the world famous Burren. The course lies within 200 yards of the historic monastic settlement of Kilmacduagh. Christy Jnr., himself was particularly excited by the new course at Gort, where he regards, the four Par 3's as among the best on offer at any course in Ireland. His equally famous uncle, Christy Senior and his good friends Eamonn Darcy and Des Smyth were loud in their praise of both the course and the club house. Having designed many Golf Courses, in Ireland and abroad, this project took me to one of the most beautiful settings in Ireland, nestled by the famous Burren and overlooking Coole Park, the home place of Lady Gregory. I started to construct what I believe will be a very fine 18 Hole Golf Course, carved through the Burren stone and natural waterways.
A winning blend of natural beauty and golfing adventure, the championship golf courses at Galway Bay Golf Resort is regarded among the very best golf courses in Ireland. When designing the course, former Ryder Cup and World Cup golfer Christy O’Connor Jnr. superbly blended the stunning backdrop of Galway Bay and the rugged curves of the Atlantic coastline with mature trees, water hazards, concealed bunkers and highly acclaimed putting surfaces. With variable wind speed and directions this Championship golf course plays differently each day posing a considerable challenge to even the lowest handicap golfers, yet it is a true and fair test of golf. As you decide on club selection the magnificent panorama of Galway Bay and its beauty is unveiled before you, with the hills of Clare to the South, while to the West sits the majestic city of Galway – city of the tribes – surrounding the rugged and unpredictable Atlantic Ocean.
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Galway Bay Golf Resort
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A winning blend of natural beauty and golfing adventure, the championship golf courses at Galway Bay Golf Resort is regarded among the very best golf courses in Ireland. When designing the course, former Ryder Cup and World Cup golfer Christy O’Connor Jnr. superbly blended the stunning backdrop of Galway Bay and the rugged curves of the Atlantic coastline with mature trees, water hazards, concealed bunkers and highly acclaimed putting surfaces. With variable wind speed and directions this Championship golf course plays differently each day posing a considerable challenge to even the lowest handicap golfers, yet it is a true and fair test of golf. As you decide on club selection the magnificent panorama of Galway Bay and its beauty is unveiled before you, with the hills of Clare to the South, while to the West sits the majestic city of Galway – city of the tribes – surrounding the rugged and unpredictable Atlantic Ocean.
Paddleboarding
Experience and explore our breathtaking Wild Altantic Way coastline on a Stand Up Paddleboard (or SUP). Our amazing venue offers the stunning backdrop of Kinvarra, framed by beautiful Dunguire Castle, waiting for you to come and enjoy. You & your group can take advantage of our unique Stand Up Paddleboard taster sessions. We'll teach you how to paddle and manover your board or if you've done it before then we can enhance your technique. This will take around 15 mins then you'll have upto 2 hours to explore our coastline and nearby beach at your leisure.
Wet Mongrel Adventures
Experience and explore our breathtaking Wild Altantic Way coastline on a Stand Up Paddleboard (or SUP). Our amazing venue offers the stunning backdrop of Kinvarra, framed by beautiful Dunguire Castle, waiting for you to come and enjoy. You & your group can take advantage of our unique Stand Up Paddleboard taster sessions. We'll teach you how to paddle and manover your board or if you've done it before then we can enhance your technique. This will take around 15 mins then you'll have upto 2 hours to explore our coastline and nearby beach at your leisure.
Surfing
One of Ireland's most famous surfing locations
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Lahinch Surf School
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One of Ireland's most famous surfing locations