Kyoto guidebook

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Kyoto guidebook

Kyoto Guide book
Nijo Castle (二条城, Nijōjō) was built in 1603 as the Kyoto residence of Tokugawa Ieyasu, the first shogun of the Edo Period (1603-1867). His grandson Iemitsu completed the castle's palace buildings 23 years later and further expanded the castle by adding a five story castle keep. The entrance of Nijo Castle is a short walk from Nijojo-mae Station along the Tozai Subway Line. From Kyoto Station, take the Karasuma Subway Line to Karasuma-Oike Station and transfer to the Tozai Line to Nijojo-mae Station. The whole trip takes about 15 minutes and costs 260 yen. Alternatively, the castle can be reached from Kyoto Station by Kyoto City Bus numbers 9, 50 or 101 (15-20 minutes, 230 yen one way) or from Shijo-Kawaramachi by Kyoto City Bus number 12 (15 minutes, 230 yen one way). Hours 8:45 to 17:00 (October to June) 8:00 to 18:00 (July and August) 8:00 to 17:00 (September) Admission ends one hour before closing time Entry to Ninomaru Palace from 8:45 to 16:10 (until 17:10 in July and August) Closed December 29-31; just the Ninomaru Palace is also closed on Tuesdays in January, July, August and December (or following day if Tuesday is a national holiday) and December 26-28 Admission 600 yen; an additional fee of 400 yen is required to enter the Ninomaru Palace English Good (English audio guides are available for 500 yen; furthermore, 90-minute guided tours of the castle in English are held twice per day for 2000 yen with online reservations possible via Voyagin)
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Nijō Castle
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Nijo Castle (二条城, Nijōjō) was built in 1603 as the Kyoto residence of Tokugawa Ieyasu, the first shogun of the Edo Period (1603-1867). His grandson Iemitsu completed the castle's palace buildings 23 years later and further expanded the castle by adding a five story castle keep. The entrance of Nijo Castle is a short walk from Nijojo-mae Station along the Tozai Subway Line. From Kyoto Station, take the Karasuma Subway Line to Karasuma-Oike Station and transfer to the Tozai Line to Nijojo-mae Station. The whole trip takes about 15 minutes and costs 260 yen. Alternatively, the castle can be reached from Kyoto Station by Kyoto City Bus numbers 9, 50 or 101 (15-20 minutes, 230 yen one way) or from Shijo-Kawaramachi by Kyoto City Bus number 12 (15 minutes, 230 yen one way). Hours 8:45 to 17:00 (October to June) 8:00 to 18:00 (July and August) 8:00 to 17:00 (September) Admission ends one hour before closing time Entry to Ninomaru Palace from 8:45 to 16:10 (until 17:10 in July and August) Closed December 29-31; just the Ninomaru Palace is also closed on Tuesdays in January, July, August and December (or following day if Tuesday is a national holiday) and December 26-28 Admission 600 yen; an additional fee of 400 yen is required to enter the Ninomaru Palace English Good (English audio guides are available for 500 yen; furthermore, 90-minute guided tours of the castle in English are held twice per day for 2000 yen with online reservations possible via Voyagin)
The Kyoto Railway Museum was opened in April 2016 by JR West on the former site of the Umekoji Train and Locomotive Museum, about a twenty minute walk west of Kyoto Station. It is is one of Japan's three great railway museums alongside JR East's Railway Museum in Saitama and JR Central's SCMAGLEV and Railway Park in Nagoya. The Kyoto Railway Museum is a few steps from Umekoji-Kyotonishi Station or a 20 minute walk from Kyoto Station. Alternatively, it is a short bus ride from Kyoto Station by bus number 103, 104, 110, 86 or 88. Get off at Kyoto Railway Museum-mae bus stop. Hours 10:00 to 17:30 (entry until 17:00) Closed Wednesdays (except when Wednesday is a national holidays and during spring and summer school holidays), December 30 to January 1 Admission 1200 yen English Minimal
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Kyoto Railway Museum
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The Kyoto Railway Museum was opened in April 2016 by JR West on the former site of the Umekoji Train and Locomotive Museum, about a twenty minute walk west of Kyoto Station. It is is one of Japan's three great railway museums alongside JR East's Railway Museum in Saitama and JR Central's SCMAGLEV and Railway Park in Nagoya. The Kyoto Railway Museum is a few steps from Umekoji-Kyotonishi Station or a 20 minute walk from Kyoto Station. Alternatively, it is a short bus ride from Kyoto Station by bus number 103, 104, 110, 86 or 88. Get off at Kyoto Railway Museum-mae bus stop. Hours 10:00 to 17:30 (entry until 17:00) Closed Wednesdays (except when Wednesday is a national holidays and during spring and summer school holidays), December 30 to January 1 Admission 1200 yen English Minimal
Nishiki Market (錦市場, Nishiki Ichiba) is a narrow, five block long shopping street lined by more than one hundred shops and restaurants. Known as "Kyoto's Kitchen", this lively retail market specializes in all things food related, like fresh seafood, produce, knives and cookware, and is a great place to find seasonal foods and Kyoto specialties, such as Japanese sweets, pickles, dried seafood and sushi. The Nishiki Market street runs parallel to Shijo Avenue, one block north of Shijo Avenue. It can be reached on foot in less than five minutes from Shijo Station on the Karasuma Subway Line (4 minutes, 210 yen from Kyoto Station) or Karasuma or Kawaramachi Stations on the Hankyu Line. Hours Varies by store, typically 9:00 to 18:00 Closed Varies by store, typically Wednesday or Sunday Admission Free
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Nishiki Market
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Nishiki Market (錦市場, Nishiki Ichiba) is a narrow, five block long shopping street lined by more than one hundred shops and restaurants. Known as "Kyoto's Kitchen", this lively retail market specializes in all things food related, like fresh seafood, produce, knives and cookware, and is a great place to find seasonal foods and Kyoto specialties, such as Japanese sweets, pickles, dried seafood and sushi. The Nishiki Market street runs parallel to Shijo Avenue, one block north of Shijo Avenue. It can be reached on foot in less than five minutes from Shijo Station on the Karasuma Subway Line (4 minutes, 210 yen from Kyoto Station) or Karasuma or Kawaramachi Stations on the Hankyu Line. Hours Varies by store, typically 9:00 to 18:00 Closed Varies by store, typically Wednesday or Sunday Admission Free
The Kyoto Imperial Palace (京都御所, Kyōto Gosho) used to be the residence of Japan's Imperial Family until 1868, when the emperor and capital were moved from Kyoto to Tokyo. It is located in the spacious Kyoto Imperial Park (京都御苑, Kyōto Gyoen), an attractive park in the center of the city that also encompasses the Sento Imperial Palace and a few other attractions. Kyoto Imperial Palace is a short subway ride from Kyoto Station along the Karasuma Subway Line. Get off at Marutamachi (7 minutes, 260 yen) or Imadegawa Station (10 minutes, 260 yen). Note that Imadegawa Station is closer to the entrance gate of the Imperial Palace than Marutamachi Station. Hours 9:00 to 17:00 (April to August) 9:00 to 16:30 (September and March) 9:00 to 16:00 (October to February) Admission ends 40 minutes before closure. Closed Mondays (or following day if Monday is a national holiday), December 28 to January 4, occasional closures when the palace is used for some events Admission Free
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Kyoto Imperial Palace
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The Kyoto Imperial Palace (京都御所, Kyōto Gosho) used to be the residence of Japan's Imperial Family until 1868, when the emperor and capital were moved from Kyoto to Tokyo. It is located in the spacious Kyoto Imperial Park (京都御苑, Kyōto Gyoen), an attractive park in the center of the city that also encompasses the Sento Imperial Palace and a few other attractions. Kyoto Imperial Palace is a short subway ride from Kyoto Station along the Karasuma Subway Line. Get off at Marutamachi (7 minutes, 260 yen) or Imadegawa Station (10 minutes, 260 yen). Note that Imadegawa Station is closer to the entrance gate of the Imperial Palace than Marutamachi Station. Hours 9:00 to 17:00 (April to August) 9:00 to 16:30 (September and March) 9:00 to 16:00 (October to February) Admission ends 40 minutes before closure. Closed Mondays (or following day if Monday is a national holiday), December 28 to January 4, occasional closures when the palace is used for some events Admission Free
Kiyomizudera (清水寺, literally "Pure Water Temple") is one of the most celebrated temples of Japan. It was founded in 780 on the site of the Otowa Waterfall in the wooded hills east of Kyoto, and derives its name from the fall's pure waters. The temple was originally associated with the Hosso sect, one of the oldest schools within Japanese Buddhism, but formed its own Kita Hosso sect in 1965. In 1994, the temple was added to the list of UNESCO world heritage sites. Kiyomizudera can be reached from Kyoto Station by bus number 100 or 206 (15 minutes, 230 yen). Get off at Gojo-zaka or Kiyomizu-michi bus stop, from where it is a ten minute uphill walk to the temple. Alternatively, Kiyomizudera is about a 20 minute walk from Kiyomizu-Gojo Station along the Keihan Railway Line. Hours 6:00 to 18:00 (until 18:30 on weekends and holidays from mid April through July and everyday in August and September) Closed No closing days Admission 400 yen ***CONSTRUCTION NOTICE:*** Kiyomizudera's main hall is covered up from February 2017 to March 2020 for the renovation of its roof. Visitors will be able to enter the main hall during the renovations.
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Kiyomizu-dera
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Kiyomizudera (清水寺, literally "Pure Water Temple") is one of the most celebrated temples of Japan. It was founded in 780 on the site of the Otowa Waterfall in the wooded hills east of Kyoto, and derives its name from the fall's pure waters. The temple was originally associated with the Hosso sect, one of the oldest schools within Japanese Buddhism, but formed its own Kita Hosso sect in 1965. In 1994, the temple was added to the list of UNESCO world heritage sites. Kiyomizudera can be reached from Kyoto Station by bus number 100 or 206 (15 minutes, 230 yen). Get off at Gojo-zaka or Kiyomizu-michi bus stop, from where it is a ten minute uphill walk to the temple. Alternatively, Kiyomizudera is about a 20 minute walk from Kiyomizu-Gojo Station along the Keihan Railway Line. Hours 6:00 to 18:00 (until 18:30 on weekends and holidays from mid April through July and everyday in August and September) Closed No closing days Admission 400 yen ***CONSTRUCTION NOTICE:*** Kiyomizudera's main hall is covered up from February 2017 to March 2020 for the renovation of its roof. Visitors will be able to enter the main hall during the renovations.
Ginkakuji (銀閣寺, Silver Pavilion) is a Zen temple along Kyoto's eastern mountains (Higashiyama). In 1482, shogun Ashikaga Yoshimasa built his retirement villa on the grounds of today's temple, modeling it after Kinkakuji (Golden Pavilion), his grandfather's retirement villa at the base of Kyoto's northern mountains (Kitayama). The villa was converted into a Zen temple after Yoshimasa's death in 1490. Ginkakuji can be accessed by direct bus number 5, 17 or 100 from Kyoto Station in about 35-40 minutes and for 230 yen one way. Alternatively, you can reach Ginkakuji by foot along the Philosopher's Path from Nanzenji in about 30-45 minutes. Hours 8:30 to 17:00 (9:00 to 16:30 from December to February) Closed No closing days Admission 500 yen
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Higashiyama Jisho-ji
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Ginkakuji (銀閣寺, Silver Pavilion) is a Zen temple along Kyoto's eastern mountains (Higashiyama). In 1482, shogun Ashikaga Yoshimasa built his retirement villa on the grounds of today's temple, modeling it after Kinkakuji (Golden Pavilion), his grandfather's retirement villa at the base of Kyoto's northern mountains (Kitayama). The villa was converted into a Zen temple after Yoshimasa's death in 1490. Ginkakuji can be accessed by direct bus number 5, 17 or 100 from Kyoto Station in about 35-40 minutes and for 230 yen one way. Alternatively, you can reach Ginkakuji by foot along the Philosopher's Path from Nanzenji in about 30-45 minutes. Hours 8:30 to 17:00 (9:00 to 16:30 from December to February) Closed No closing days Admission 500 yen
Gion (祇園) is Kyoto's most famous geisha district, located around Shijo Avenue between Yasaka Shrine in the east and the Kamo River in the west. It is filled with shops, restaurants and ochaya (teahouses), where geiko (Kyoto dialect for geisha) and maiko (geiko apprentices) entertain. Gion attracts tourists with its high concentration of traditional wooden machiya merchant houses. Due to the fact that property taxes were formerly based upon street frontage, the houses were built with narrow facades only five to six meters wide, but extend up to twenty meters in from the street. Gion can be reached from Kyoto Station by bus number 100 or 206 (20 minutes, 230 yen). Get off at Gion bus stop. Alternatively, the closest train stations are Gion Shijo Station on the Keihan Line and Kawaramachi Station on the Hankyu Line.
Gionmachi Kitagawa
Gion (祇園) is Kyoto's most famous geisha district, located around Shijo Avenue between Yasaka Shrine in the east and the Kamo River in the west. It is filled with shops, restaurants and ochaya (teahouses), where geiko (Kyoto dialect for geisha) and maiko (geiko apprentices) entertain. Gion attracts tourists with its high concentration of traditional wooden machiya merchant houses. Due to the fact that property taxes were formerly based upon street frontage, the houses were built with narrow facades only five to six meters wide, but extend up to twenty meters in from the street. Gion can be reached from Kyoto Station by bus number 100 or 206 (20 minutes, 230 yen). Get off at Gion bus stop. Alternatively, the closest train stations are Gion Shijo Station on the Keihan Line and Kawaramachi Station on the Hankyu Line.
Maruyama Park (円山公園, Maruyama Kōen) is a public park next to Yasaka Shrine in the Higashiyama District. In the first half of April, when the cherry trees are in full bloom, the park becomes Kyoto's most popular and most crowded spot for cherry blossom viewing parties (hanami). The centerpiece of the park is a tall shidarezakura (weeping cherry tree), which gets lit up in the night. Maruyama Park can be reached by bus from Kyoto Station in about 20 minutes. Take number 100 or 206 and get off at Gion bus stop. The park is just behind Yasaka Shrine. Alternatively, the park can be reached in a 15+ minute walk from Kiyomizudera through the narrow lanes of the Higashiyama District.
Maruyama Park Ikkyu-an Public Bathroom
Maruyama Park (円山公園, Maruyama Kōen) is a public park next to Yasaka Shrine in the Higashiyama District. In the first half of April, when the cherry trees are in full bloom, the park becomes Kyoto's most popular and most crowded spot for cherry blossom viewing parties (hanami). The centerpiece of the park is a tall shidarezakura (weeping cherry tree), which gets lit up in the night. Maruyama Park can be reached by bus from Kyoto Station in about 20 minutes. Take number 100 or 206 and get off at Gion bus stop. The park is just behind Yasaka Shrine. Alternatively, the park can be reached in a 15+ minute walk from Kiyomizudera through the narrow lanes of the Higashiyama District.
Yasaka Shrine (八坂神社, Yasaka Jinja), also known as Gion Shrine, is one of the most famous shrines in Kyoto. Founded over 1350 years ago, the shrine is located between the popular Gion District and Higashiyama District, and is often visited by tourists walking between the two districts. Yasaka Shrine can be reached by bus from Kyoto Station in about 20 minutes. Take number 100 or 206 and get off at Gion bus stop. The closest train stations are Gion Shijo Station on the Keihan Line and Kawaramachi Station on the Hankyu Line. Alternatively, the 20-30 minute walk from Kiyomizudera through the narrow lanes of the Higashiyama District to Yasaka Shrine is highly recommended.
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Yasaka Shrine
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Yasaka Shrine (八坂神社, Yasaka Jinja), also known as Gion Shrine, is one of the most famous shrines in Kyoto. Founded over 1350 years ago, the shrine is located between the popular Gion District and Higashiyama District, and is often visited by tourists walking between the two districts. Yasaka Shrine can be reached by bus from Kyoto Station in about 20 minutes. Take number 100 or 206 and get off at Gion bus stop. The closest train stations are Gion Shijo Station on the Keihan Line and Kawaramachi Station on the Hankyu Line. Alternatively, the 20-30 minute walk from Kiyomizudera through the narrow lanes of the Higashiyama District to Yasaka Shrine is highly recommended.
Nanzenji Temple (南禅寺), whose spacious grounds are located at the base of Kyoto's forested Higashiyama mountains, is one of the most important Zen temples in all of Japan. It is the head temple of one of the schools within the Rinzai sect of Japanese Zen Buddhism and includes multiple subtemples, that make the already large complex of temple buildings even larger. Nanzenji is a 5-10 minute walk from the nearest subway station, Keage Station on the Tozai Line (about 20 minutes, 260 yen from Kyoto Station by subway via Karasuma-Oike Station), or a 5-10 minute walk from the nearest bus stop, Nanzenji-Eikando-michi bus stop (35 minutes, 230 yen from Kyoto Station by Kyoto City Bus number 5). Nanzenji is also located only a short walk from the southern end of the Philosopher's Path, while Ginkakuji Temple is at the northern end.
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Nanzen-ji Temple
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Nanzenji Temple (南禅寺), whose spacious grounds are located at the base of Kyoto's forested Higashiyama mountains, is one of the most important Zen temples in all of Japan. It is the head temple of one of the schools within the Rinzai sect of Japanese Zen Buddhism and includes multiple subtemples, that make the already large complex of temple buildings even larger. Nanzenji is a 5-10 minute walk from the nearest subway station, Keage Station on the Tozai Line (about 20 minutes, 260 yen from Kyoto Station by subway via Karasuma-Oike Station), or a 5-10 minute walk from the nearest bus stop, Nanzenji-Eikando-michi bus stop (35 minutes, 230 yen from Kyoto Station by Kyoto City Bus number 5). Nanzenji is also located only a short walk from the southern end of the Philosopher's Path, while Ginkakuji Temple is at the northern end.
Fushimi Inari Shrine (伏見稲荷大社, Fushimi Inari Taisha) is an important Shinto shrine in southern Kyoto. It is famous for its thousands of vermilion torii gates, which straddle a network of trails behind its main buildings. The trails lead into the wooded forest of the sacred Mount Inari, which stands at 233 meters and belongs to the shrine grounds. Fushimi Inari Shrine is located just outside JR Inari Station, the second station from Kyoto Station along the JR Nara Line (5 minutes, 140 yen one way from Kyoto Station, not served by rapid trains). The shrine can also be reached in a short walk from Fushimi Inari Station along the Keihan Main Line.
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Fushimi Inari-taisha
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Fushimi Inari Shrine (伏見稲荷大社, Fushimi Inari Taisha) is an important Shinto shrine in southern Kyoto. It is famous for its thousands of vermilion torii gates, which straddle a network of trails behind its main buildings. The trails lead into the wooded forest of the sacred Mount Inari, which stands at 233 meters and belongs to the shrine grounds. Fushimi Inari Shrine is located just outside JR Inari Station, the second station from Kyoto Station along the JR Nara Line (5 minutes, 140 yen one way from Kyoto Station, not served by rapid trains). The shrine can also be reached in a short walk from Fushimi Inari Station along the Keihan Main Line.
Daigoji (醍醐寺) is an important temple of the Shingon sect of Japanese Buddhism and a designated world heritage site. The large temple complex stands southeast of central Kyoto and includes an entire mountainside. The main temple grounds are located at the base of the mountain and are connected via a hiking trail to several more temple buildings around the summit. Daigoji Temple is located a 15 minute walk or short bus ride by community bus number 4 (200 yen, every 30 minutes) from Daigo Station along the Tozai Subway Line. From Kyoto Station, take a JR train to Yamashina Station (5 minutes, 190 yen) and transfer to the Tozai Subway Line (8 minutes, 260 yen). Alternatively, take Keihan Bus number 22 or 22A from Yamashina Station to Daigoji (20 minutes, 220 yen, departures every 20 minutes). Keihan Bus also operates direct buses called "Yamashina Express" between Kyoto Station (Hachijo side) and Daigoji. The one way trip takes 30 minutes and costs 300 yen. Buses depart every 30-50 minutes. Sanboin, Shimo Daigo and Reihokan Museum (lower grounds) Hours 9:00 to 17:00 (until 16:00 from early December through February), admission ends 30 minutes before closing Closed No closing days Admission 1500 yen (from March 20 to May 15 and from October 15 to December 10) 800 yen (during the rest of the year) Kami Daigo (upper grounds) Hours Entry from 9:00 to 16:00 (until 15:00 from December through February), everybody must return to the base of the mountain by 17:00 Closed No closing days Admission 600 yen
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Daigoji
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Daigoji (醍醐寺) is an important temple of the Shingon sect of Japanese Buddhism and a designated world heritage site. The large temple complex stands southeast of central Kyoto and includes an entire mountainside. The main temple grounds are located at the base of the mountain and are connected via a hiking trail to several more temple buildings around the summit. Daigoji Temple is located a 15 minute walk or short bus ride by community bus number 4 (200 yen, every 30 minutes) from Daigo Station along the Tozai Subway Line. From Kyoto Station, take a JR train to Yamashina Station (5 minutes, 190 yen) and transfer to the Tozai Subway Line (8 minutes, 260 yen). Alternatively, take Keihan Bus number 22 or 22A from Yamashina Station to Daigoji (20 minutes, 220 yen, departures every 20 minutes). Keihan Bus also operates direct buses called "Yamashina Express" between Kyoto Station (Hachijo side) and Daigoji. The one way trip takes 30 minutes and costs 300 yen. Buses depart every 30-50 minutes. Sanboin, Shimo Daigo and Reihokan Museum (lower grounds) Hours 9:00 to 17:00 (until 16:00 from early December through February), admission ends 30 minutes before closing Closed No closing days Admission 1500 yen (from March 20 to May 15 and from October 15 to December 10) 800 yen (during the rest of the year) Kami Daigo (upper grounds) Hours Entry from 9:00 to 16:00 (until 15:00 from December through February), everybody must return to the base of the mountain by 17:00 Closed No closing days Admission 600 yen
Tofukuji (東福寺, Tōfukuji) is a large Zen temple in southeastern Kyoto that is particularly famous for its spectacular autumn colors. The temple was founded in 1236 at the behest of the powerful Fujiwara clan. Its name is a combination of the names of two great temples in Nara that were also associated with the Fujiwara, Todaiji Temple and Kofukuji Temple. Tofukuji has historically been one of the principal Zen temples in Kyoto, and is a head temple of one of the schools of the Rinzai sect of Zen Buddhism. Tofukuji is a ten minute walk from Tofukuji Station on the JR Nara Line (2 minutes, 140 yen from Kyoto Station) and the Keihan Main Line. Alternatively, the temple is a ten minute walk from Tofukuji bus stop (15 minutes, 230 yen from Kyoto Station by Kyoto City Bus 208). Hours and Fees Hours 9:00 to 16:30 (April to October) 8:30 to 16:30 (November to early December) 9:00 to 16:00 (early December to March) Admission ends 30 minutes before closing time. Closed No closing days Admission 400 yen (Tsutenkyo Bridge and Kaisando Hall), 400 yen (Hojo and gardens)
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臨済宗大本山東福寺
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Tofukuji (東福寺, Tōfukuji) is a large Zen temple in southeastern Kyoto that is particularly famous for its spectacular autumn colors. The temple was founded in 1236 at the behest of the powerful Fujiwara clan. Its name is a combination of the names of two great temples in Nara that were also associated with the Fujiwara, Todaiji Temple and Kofukuji Temple. Tofukuji has historically been one of the principal Zen temples in Kyoto, and is a head temple of one of the schools of the Rinzai sect of Zen Buddhism. Tofukuji is a ten minute walk from Tofukuji Station on the JR Nara Line (2 minutes, 140 yen from Kyoto Station) and the Keihan Main Line. Alternatively, the temple is a ten minute walk from Tofukuji bus stop (15 minutes, 230 yen from Kyoto Station by Kyoto City Bus 208). Hours and Fees Hours 9:00 to 16:30 (April to October) 8:30 to 16:30 (November to early December) 9:00 to 16:00 (early December to March) Admission ends 30 minutes before closing time. Closed No closing days Admission 400 yen (Tsutenkyo Bridge and Kaisando Hall), 400 yen (Hojo and gardens)
Toji Temple (東寺, Tōji), literally "East Temple", was founded at the beginning of the Heian Period just after the capital was moved to Kyoto in the late 700s. The large temple, together with its now defunct sister temple Saiji ("West Temple"), flanked the south entrance to the city and served as the capital's guardian temples. Toji Temple is one of Kyoto's many UNESCO world heritage sites. Toji is located a 15 minute walk southwest of Kyoto Station. Alternatively, it can be reached in a five minute walk from Toji Station along the Kintetsu Kyoto Line (2 minutes, 150 yen from Kyoto Station). Hours and Fees Hours 8:00 to 17:00 (entry until 16:30) Closed No closing days Admission 500 yen (800 yen during special openings of the pagoda)
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Toji
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Toji Temple (東寺, Tōji), literally "East Temple", was founded at the beginning of the Heian Period just after the capital was moved to Kyoto in the late 700s. The large temple, together with its now defunct sister temple Saiji ("West Temple"), flanked the south entrance to the city and served as the capital's guardian temples. Toji Temple is one of Kyoto's many UNESCO world heritage sites. Toji is located a 15 minute walk southwest of Kyoto Station. Alternatively, it can be reached in a five minute walk from Toji Station along the Kintetsu Kyoto Line (2 minutes, 150 yen from Kyoto Station). Hours and Fees Hours 8:00 to 17:00 (entry until 16:30) Closed No closing days Admission 500 yen (800 yen during special openings of the pagoda)
Saihoji (西芳寺, Saihōji), more commonly known as Kokedera (苔寺), is one of Kyoto's Unesco World Heritage Sites. Entrance to this temple requires a reservation made well in advance. Kokedera means Moss Temple, referring to the temple garden's estimated 120 different varieties of moss. Visitors to the temple can walk through this spectacular garden, which has strongly influenced subsequent Japanese garden design. Kokedera is a 20 minute walk from Matsuo Taisha Station on the Hankyu Arashiyama Line. From Kyoto Station Take the Karasuma Subway Line to Shijo Station (3 minutes) and transfer to a Hankyu Kyoto Line train to Katsura Station (8 minutes). At Katsura Station, switch to the Hankyu Arashiyama Line which takes five minutes to Matsuo Taisha Station. In total, the trip takes about 30 minutes and costs 430 yen. Alternatively, Kyoto Bus number 73 runs two to three times per hour from Kyoto Station via Arashiyama to Kokedera (1 hour, 230 yen one way, not covered by the 500 yen 1-day bus pass). On busy days, this bus is likely to be delayed due to congestion in the Arashiyama area. How to get to and around Kyoto Hours and Fees Kokedera requires advance reservations by postal mail. These days, reservations can also be made through online services that are not related to the temple. The admission fee of 3000 yen per person is paid at the time of the visit.
Kokedera Suzumushitera Bus Stop
Saihoji (西芳寺, Saihōji), more commonly known as Kokedera (苔寺), is one of Kyoto's Unesco World Heritage Sites. Entrance to this temple requires a reservation made well in advance. Kokedera means Moss Temple, referring to the temple garden's estimated 120 different varieties of moss. Visitors to the temple can walk through this spectacular garden, which has strongly influenced subsequent Japanese garden design. Kokedera is a 20 minute walk from Matsuo Taisha Station on the Hankyu Arashiyama Line. From Kyoto Station Take the Karasuma Subway Line to Shijo Station (3 minutes) and transfer to a Hankyu Kyoto Line train to Katsura Station (8 minutes). At Katsura Station, switch to the Hankyu Arashiyama Line which takes five minutes to Matsuo Taisha Station. In total, the trip takes about 30 minutes and costs 430 yen. Alternatively, Kyoto Bus number 73 runs two to three times per hour from Kyoto Station via Arashiyama to Kokedera (1 hour, 230 yen one way, not covered by the 500 yen 1-day bus pass). On busy days, this bus is likely to be delayed due to congestion in the Arashiyama area. How to get to and around Kyoto Hours and Fees Kokedera requires advance reservations by postal mail. These days, reservations can also be made through online services that are not related to the temple. The admission fee of 3000 yen per person is paid at the time of the visit.