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Premise
“Grand, spired circa-1700s church with stained glass, a painted ceiling & an active congregation.”
  • 41 íbúi mælir með
Kirkjugarður
“Marie Laveau the Voodoo queen is buried here! Oldest surviving cemetery in New Orleans. Tour guide required by law. ”
  • 52 íbúar mæla með
Kirkja
“Simply gorgeous inside and out! Walk around it, go inside and visit the park in front of it and all the art displayed. ”
  • 43 íbúar mæla með
Kirkjugarður
“Historic battle was fought here. Information is provided on the spot. You can take the Chalmette ferry to get there. ”
  • 38 íbúar mæla með
Kirkjugarður
“if you want to check out a cemetery this one is short walk away. Bring your camera. ”
  • 28 íbúar mæla með
Kirkjugarður
“Located in what now is the heart of the Garden District, between Washington, Sixth, Prytania, and Coliseum streets, Lafayette Cemetery No. 1 is the oldest of the seven municipal, city-operated cemeteries in New Orleans. It is a non-segregated, non-denominational cemetery. There are immigrants from over 25 different countries and natives of 26 states as identified on the closure tablets. The developers commissioned City surveyor Benjamin Buisson to develop a plan. The plan, dated March 5, 1832, subdivided the area between First Street and Toledano. The cemetery was laid out with two center aisles, a cruciform (cross) pattern, lined with trees giving it a park or garden-like appearance, and divided the cemetery into four sections. The intersecting avenues were built to accommodate funeral processions and originally paved with shells. The cemetery was named for the City of Lafayette, which was annexed to the City of New Orleans as the Fourth District. The area of New Orleans that once was the city of Lafayette consists of two designated historical districts, the Irish Channel and the Garden District. The residents of the Irish Channel were first-generation immigrants many from Ireland and Germany, the two largest groups of immigrants to settle in New Orleans in the two decades before the Civil War. It was known as a working-class poor neighborhood, a rough and tough riverfront area. The Garden District, on the other hand, represented the new wealth of immigrants from Great Britain and the North who came and made their fortunes as cotton factors, brokers, and merchants after the Louisiana Purchase. They are often called “Southern Yankees.” In the cemetery, there are almost 500 wall vaults on Washington Avenue which have been sealed. Only a few of the plaques are engraved. In Lafayette Cemetery No. 1, there are society tombs for several volunteer fireman organizations (now extinct), the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, German Presbyterian Community, Home For Destitute Orphan Boys, Poydras Orphans Home, YMCA, and the New Orleans Home for Incurables. Individual family tombs in Lafayette Cemetery No. 1 feature Judge Ferguson of the Plessy vs. Ferguson “separate-but-equal” case. Also buried in the cemetery is Brigadier General Harry T. Hays who led the 1st Louisiana Brigade. The Brunie family, buried here, were notable jazz musicians who were associated with Papa Laine and the New Orleans Rhythm Kings. Perhaps the most famous residents of Lafayette Cemetery No. 1 are fictional. The tomb for the Mayfair witches, created by Anne Rice, in The Witching Hour, fits a combination of the Lafayette and Jefferson fireman tombs. Rice also staged a jazz funeral where she rode in a glass enclosed coffin down the center aisle to introduce her book Memnoch the Devil. The vampire Lestat’s tomb, made from Styrofoam for the movie, Interview with a Vampire, was possibly modeled after the cast iron Karstendiek tomb. Many other movies have been filmed in the cemetery, including Double Jeopardy in 1999 and Dracula 2000 in 2000. Other filming has taken place in the cemetery, such as music videos by acts such as LeAnn Rimes and the New Kids on the Block. There are about 1,100 family tombs and more than 7,000 people buried in Lafayette Cemetery No. I, in a single city block.”
  • 26 íbúar mæla með
Kirkjugarður
“In the center of this off-the-beaten-path cemetery is the St Roch Chapel. Inside the chapel is the most interesting shrine in the city - its filled with small momentos of answered prayers of healing, like glass eyes, crutches, small ceramic hands, feet, and other ancient tokens of thanks, many marked with the french word for thanks, "Merci". ”
  • 19 íbúar mæla með
Opera House
“Marigny Opera House is an old Catholic church converted into a performance space. It hosts ballets, theater pieces, and other performances. It is also notable as the wedding venue for Solange Knowles.”
  • 21 íbúi mælir með
Kirkja
“Oldest African American Catholic Church, Sunday Mass 10am-12pm with remarkable jazz choir. ”
  • 19 íbúar mæla með
Kirkjugarður
“One of the most unusual cemeteries in New Orleans. Once called "Little Saxony," St Roch Cemetery was founded by Rev. P.L. Thevis in 1874. This place if full of history. Free admission!”
  • 8 íbúar mæla með
Kirkjugarður
“One of the iconic above-ground cemeteries that New Orleans is known for. Full of history and iconic architecture. Across the street from this cemetery is where you get on the Canal Street streetcar to go downtown.”
  • 6 íbúar mæla með
Kirkjugarður
“One of the iconic above-ground cemeteries that New Orleans is known for. Metairie Cemetery is one of the more expansive cemeteries in the city.”
  • 4 íbúar mæla með
Kirkjugarður
“You can see it from the road, but a walk around the cemetery gives you an experience like no other.”
  • 2 íbúar mæla með
Kirkjugarður
“One of the many above-ground cemeteries located at the end of the Canal Street streetcar line. Historic cemetery that contains the Hurricane Katrina memorial.”
  • 6 íbúar mæla með
Kirkjugarður
“Cemetary where you can take an audio tour in your car. Closes at 5:00 so you have to get there by 4 or they won't let you take the CDs. ”
  • 6 íbúar mæla með
Kirkjugarður
“Hop on the streetcar to the foot of Canal St. to find iconic above-ground tombs in our famous cemeteries.”
  • 2 íbúar mæla með