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Central Athens Regional Unit - Skoðunarferðir og kennileiti

Listasöfn

Listasafn
“A big former brewery now Athens' gallery of contemporary art, mostly Greek artists. Worth a visit for the Janine Antoni piece alone which is amazing. A refreshing change from the usual tourist diet of yet more ancient artifacts poorly displayed. The Museum has free WiFi and a good free app with written and audio guides of many of the pieces on display. The "ten highlights" quick tour is enjoyable and thought-provoking - recommended. Note that reopening in March 2020 entry is free for the month, but not all the exhibits are open, and the cafe and restaurant are closed. There is a bag check for security. There is a nice view of the Acropolis and Philopappos Hill from the terrace. There are some very good cafes and sweet cake/confectionery shops on the street opposite. ”
  • 65 íbúar mæla með
History Museum
“The world’s most extensive collection of ancient Cycladic art. The main building was completed in 1980. Temporary exhibitions are held in the Stathatos Mansion, a neoclassical residence with a porticoed entrance, roof statuary and atrium. A glass-topped internal walkway connects the two wings. Established in 1986 to house the private collection of the Goulandris shipping family, it focuses on ancient cultures of the Aegean, especially that of the Cyclades during the 3rd millennium BC. Must-see: The most prized exhibits are the Cycladic figurines. These idols—from the schematic, spade-shaped Early Cycladic (c3200 BC) figurine to the precisely defined 1.40-metre tall female statue from Keros (c2800-2300 BC)—comprise the core of the collection.”
  • 69 íbúar mæla með
History Museum
“Funded by one of Greece's richest families, this museum has an outstanding collection of 350 Cycladic artifacts dating from the Bronze Age, including many of the enigmatic marble figurines whose slender shapes fascinated such artists as Picasso, Modigliani, and Brancusi. The main building is an imposing glass-and-steel design dating from 1985 and built to convey "the sense of austerity and the diffusion of refracted light that predominate in the Cycladic landscape," as the museum puts it. Along with Cycladic masterpieces, a wide array from other eras is also on view, ranging from the Bronze Age through the 6th century AD. The third floor is devoted to Cypriot art, while the fourth floor showcases a fascinating exhibition on "scenes from daily life in antiquity." To handle the overflow, a new wing opened in 2005. A glass corridor connects the main building to the gorgeous 19th-century neoclassical Stathatos Mansion, where temporary exhibits are mounted. There is also a lovely skylighted café in an enclosed courtyard around a Cycladic-inspired fountain, a charming art shop, and many children-oriented activities all year-round.”
  • 50 íbúar mæla með
Vettvangur fyrir sviðslistir
“The “alternative “ modern art and theater building of Athens. On top floor world acknowledged 2 Michelin stars restaurant HYTRA.”
  • 22 íbúar mæla með
Vettvangur fyrir sviðslistir
“ONASSIS FOUNDATION is the best place for those who love art, theatre, music and performances.Also on the top floor ,you can taste the best food in Athens made by the best chef of Athens!!!”
  • 28 íbúar mæla með
Listasafn
“Beautiful art collection from all corners of the Islamic world and a cafe with acropolis view”
  • 12 íbúar mæla með
Listasafn
“Frissiras Museum is a contemporary painting museum in Plaka Athens, Greece. It was founded and endowed by Vlassis Frissiras, an art-collecting lawyer. Its permanent collection consists of 3000 paintings and sculptures by Greek and other European artists on the subject of the human form.”
  • 8 íbúar mæla með

Kennileitisupplifanir

Sögusöfn

History Museum
“A vividly curated trove of stunning sculptures, ceramics, and other treasures from the Acropolis.The 14,000 square-metre glass and concrete landmark, designed by the architect Bernard Tschumi, was completed in 2009.Beyond the obvious reason that it houses the treasures of the Acropolis, the museum has also consistently figured on lists of the world’s top 10 museums, both for its contents and its design.The grounds of the early 19th-century Weiler Building, which had been used in the 1930s as an army barracks and later gendarmerie. It now houses the Acropolis Studies Centre. Must-see: The Parthenon Gallery on the top floor is ingeniously designed to recreate the magnificent temple’s frieze, using cast copies of sections currently in the British Museum and other collections. ”
  • 485 íbúar mæla með
History Museum
“One of the greatest museums in the world with the richest collection of Greek artefacts from neolithic to classical times.Construction began in 1866 to a design by Ludwig Lange and was completed in 1889 by Ernst Ziller.It’s one of the world’s top collections of Greek antiquities and certainly the richest, with the 11,000 items on permanent display comprising just half of the museum’s holdings.With some 8,000 square metres of exhibition space, it’s hard to take in this panorama of Greek civilisation and achievement in a single visit. So it’s best to either stick to the most celebrated exhibits or focus on a single gallery or theme. Must-see: There is so much not to miss that this truly depends on your interests. The ‘Mask of Agamemnon’, the Santorini frescoes, the bronze Zeus or Poseidon and the ‘Jockey of Artemision’ are among the most popular exhibits. ”
  • 278 íbúar mæla með
History Museum
“The world’s most extensive collection of ancient Cycladic art. The main building was completed in 1980. Temporary exhibitions are held in the Stathatos Mansion, a neoclassical residence with a porticoed entrance, roof statuary and atrium. A glass-topped internal walkway connects the two wings. Established in 1986 to house the private collection of the Goulandris shipping family, it focuses on ancient cultures of the Aegean, especially that of the Cyclades during the 3rd millennium BC. Must-see: The most prized exhibits are the Cycladic figurines. These idols—from the schematic, spade-shaped Early Cycladic (c3200 BC) figurine to the precisely defined 1.40-metre tall female statue from Keros (c2800-2300 BC)—comprise the core of the collection.”
  • 69 íbúar mæla með
History Museum
“ A trove of religious art and artefacts from the Byzantium, housed in an enchanting monastery-style building and gardens. It wa built in 1848, in the style of a Florentine palace. A 12,000-sqm underground wing was added in the 1990s. With more than 25,000 artefacts in its possession, the museum’s collection of Early Christian, Byzantine and Medieval religious artefacts is unsurpassed in size and scope. Must-see: While Byzantine culture was almost entirely concerned with religious expression, the diversity of the techniques, subjects and approaches used throughout the Byzantine Empire is extraordinary. Look out for miniature sculptures on themes such as the ‘Descent into Hell’ and a ninth-century relief carving of the ‘Tree of Life’.”
  • 59 íbúar mæla með
History Museum
“Funded by one of Greece's richest families, this museum has an outstanding collection of 350 Cycladic artifacts dating from the Bronze Age, including many of the enigmatic marble figurines whose slender shapes fascinated such artists as Picasso, Modigliani, and Brancusi. The main building is an imposing glass-and-steel design dating from 1985 and built to convey "the sense of austerity and the diffusion of refracted light that predominate in the Cycladic landscape," as the museum puts it. Along with Cycladic masterpieces, a wide array from other eras is also on view, ranging from the Bronze Age through the 6th century AD. The third floor is devoted to Cypriot art, while the fourth floor showcases a fascinating exhibition on "scenes from daily life in antiquity." To handle the overflow, a new wing opened in 2005. A glass corridor connects the main building to the gorgeous 19th-century neoclassical Stathatos Mansion, where temporary exhibits are mounted. There is also a lovely skylighted café in an enclosed courtyard around a Cycladic-inspired fountain, a charming art shop, and many children-oriented activities all year-round.”
  • 50 íbúar mæla með
History Museum
“The most modern museum of Athens with remarkable ancient findings , critical for Greece's culture.”
  • 21 íbúi mælir með
History Museum
“The National Historical Museum (Greek: Εθνικό Ιστορικό Μουσείο,[1] Ethnikó Istorikó Mouseío) is a historical museum in Athens. Founded in 1882, is the oldest of its kind in Greece. It is located in the Old Parliament House at Stadiou Street in Athens, which housed the Hellenic Parliament from 1875 until 1932. Collections The museum houses the collection of the Historical and Ethnological Society of Greece (IEEE), founded in 1882.[2] It is the oldest collection of its kind in Greece, and prior to its transfer to the Old Parliament, it was housed in the main building of the National Technical University. The collection contains historical items concerning the period from the capture of Constantinopolis by the Ottomans in 1453 to the Second World War, emphasizing especially the period of the Greek Revolution and the subsequent establishment of the modern Greek state. Among the items displayed are weapons, personal belongings and memorabilia from historical personalities, historical paintings by Greek and foreign artists, manuscripts, as well as a large collection of traditional Greek costumes from various regions. The collection is displayed in the corridors and rooms of the building, while the great central hall of the National Assembly is used for conferences.”
  • 10 íbúar mæla með

Söguferðir

Útsýnisstaðir

Hill
“Going uphill to Acropois you meet on your right hand , first the Dionysos theater and then Herodion theater ( out of it is the kiosk where i work , i would be glad to see you there and help you ) . Many coffee shops and restaurants around .”
  • 377 íbúar mæla með
Annað útivist
“Myth claims that Athens's highest hill came into existence when Athena removed a piece of Mt. Pendeli, intending to boost the height of her temple on the Acropolis. While she was en route, a crone brought her bad tidings, and the flustered goddess dropped the rock in the middle of the city. Dog-walkers and joggers have made it their daily stomping grounds, and kids love the ride up the steeply inclined teleferique (funicular) to the summit (one ride every 30 minutes), crowned by whitewashed Ayios Georgios chapel with a bell tower donated by Queen Olga. On a clear day, you can see Piraeus port and as far as Aegina island. Built into a cave on the side of the hill is a small shrine to Ayios Isidoros. Cars park up at the top at sunset for swoon-inducing magic-hour views of the city lights going on, as the moon rises over "violet-crowned" Mt. Hymettus. Refreshments are available from the modest kiosk popular with concertgoers, who flock to events at the hill's open-air theater during summer months. Diners should also note that Lycabettus is home to Orizontes Lykavittou, an excellent fish restaurant (by day this establishment also houses the relaxing Café Lycabettus).”
  • 204 íbúar mæla með
Annað útivist
“Philopappou, or the Hill of the Muses, is one of three forested peaks facing the Acropolis that each played an important role in ancient Athens. The Athenian Assembly met on the Pnyx, while the third was known for a sanctuary dedicated to the Nymphs. These wooded hills cover a total area of some 180 acres. Some of the most delightful scenery is along a stone-laid path winding through the shallow canyon between these hills. Excavations here have uncovered the Koile Road, the primary route for transporting merchandise between Athens and the harbour of Piraeus in antiquity. Look closely and you’ll see the tracks left by carts on the rock surface—a wonderful contrast with the arty street furnishings and ingeniously-designed pathways designed by Greek architect Dimitris Pikionis in the 1950s.”
  • 138 íbúar mæla með
Sögufrægur staður
“You don't have to look far in Athens to encounter perfection. Towering above all—both physically and spiritually—stands the Acropolis, a millennia-old survivor. The Greek term Acropolis means High City, and today's traveler who climbs this table-like hill is paying tribute to the prime source of Western civilization. Most of the notable structures on this flat-top limestone outcrop, 512 feet high, were built from 461 to 429 BC, when the intellectual and artistic life of Athens flowered under the influence of the Athenian statesman Pericles. Since then, the buildings of the Acropolis have undergone transformations into, at various times, a Florentine palace, an Islamic mosque, and a Turkish harem. They have also weathered the hazards of wars, right up to 1944, when British paratroopers positioned their bazookas between the Parthenon's columns. Today, the Erechtheion temple has been completely restored, and conservation work on the Parthenon is ongoing, focusing now on the western side. With most of the major restoration work now completed, a visit to the Acropolis evokes the spirit of the ancient heroes and gods who were once worshiped here. The sight of the Parthenon—the Panathenaic temple at the crest of this ieros vrachos (sacred rock) —has the power to stir the heart as few other ancient relics do. The walk through the Acropolis takes about four hours, depending on the crowds, including an hour spent in the New Acropolis Museum. In general, the earlier you start out the better—in summer the heat is blistering by noon and the light's reflection off the rock and marble ruins is almost blinding. Remember to bring water, sunscreen, nonslip footwear, and a hat to protect yourself from the sun. An alternative, in summer, is to visit after 5 pm, when the light is best for taking photographs. The two hours before sunset, when the fabled violet light occasionally spreads from the crest of Mt. Hymettus and embraces the Acropolis, is an ideal time to visit in any season. After dark the hill is spectacularly floodlighted, creating a scene visible from many parts of the capital. You enter the Acropolis complex through the Beulé Gate, a late-Roman structure named for the French archaeologist who discovered the gate in 1852. Before Roman times, the entrance to the Acropolis was a steep ramp below the Temple of Athena Nike that was used every fourth year for the Panathenaic procession, a spectacle that honored Athena's remarkable birth (she sprang from the head of her father, Zeus). When you enter the gate, ask for the free, information-packed bilingual (in English and Greek) pamphlet guide. At the loftiest point of the Acropolis stands the Parthenon, the architectural masterpiece conceived by Pericles and executed between 447 and 438 BC. It not only raised the bar in terms of sheer size, but also in the perfection of its proportions. Dedicated to the goddess Athena (the name comes from the Athena Parthenos, the virgin Athena), the Parthenon served primarily as the treasury of the Delian League, an ancient alliance of cities formed to defeat the Persian incursion. In fact, the Parthenon was built as much to honor the city's power as to venerate the goddess. After the Persian army sacked Athens in 480-479 BC, the city-state banded with Sparta, and together they routed the Persians by 449 BC. To proclaim its hegemony over all Greece, Athens then set about constructing its Acropolis, ending a 30-year building moratorium. Once you pass through the Beulé Gate you will find the Temple of Athena Nike. Designed by Kallikrates, the mini-temple was built in 427–424 BC to celebrate peace with Persia. The bas-reliefs on the surrounding parapet depict the Victories leading heifers to be sacrificed. Past the temple, the imposing Propylaea structure was designed to instill the proper reverence in worshipers as they crossed from the temporal world into the spiritual world of the sanctuary, for this was the main function of the Acropolis. The Propylaea was intended to have been the same size as the Parthenon, and thus the grandest secular building in Greece, but construction was suspended during the Peloponnesian War, and it was never finished. The structure shows the first use of the Attic style, which combines both Doric and Ionic columns. The building's slender Ionic columns had elegant capitals, some of which have been restored along with a section of the famed paneled ceiling, originally decorated with gold, eight-pointed stars on a blue background. Adjacent to the Pinakotheke, or art gallery (which has paintings of scenes from Homer's epics and mythological tableaux), the south wing is a decorative portico (row of columns). The view from the inner porch of the Propylaea is stunning: the Parthenon is suddenly revealed in its full glory, framed by the columns. If the Parthenon is the masterpiece of Doric architecture, the Erechtheion is undoubtedly the prime exemplar of the more graceful Ionic order. A considerably smaller structure than the Parthenon, it outmatches, for sheer elegance and refinement of design, all other buildings of the Greco-Roman world. For the populace, the Erechtheion, completed in 406 BC, remained Athena's holiest shrine, for legend has it that Poseidon plunged his trident into the rock on this spot, dramatically producing a spring of water, while Athena created a simple olive tree, whose produce remains a main staple of Greek society. A panel of judges declared the goddess the winner, and the city was named Athena. The most delightful feature is the south portico, known as the Caryatid Porch. It is supported on the heads of six maidens (caryatids) wearing delicately draped Ionian garments. What you see at the site today are copies; the originals are in the New Acropolis Museum. Most people take the metro to the Acropolis station, where the Acropolis Museum is just across the main exit. They then follow the Dionyssiou Aeropagitou, the pedestrianized street which traces the foothill of the Acropolis to its entrance at the Beulé Gate. Another entrance is along the rock's northern face via the pretty Peripatos, a paved path from the Plaka district. The summit of the Acropolis can also now be reached by people with disabilities via an elevator. Don't throw away your Acropolis ticket after your tour. It will get you into all the other sites in the Unification of Archaeological Sites for five days— at no extra cost. Guides to the Acropolis are quite informative and will also help kids understand the site better.”
  • 58 íbúar mæla með
Torg fyrir gangandi vegfarendur
“For the Greeks in ancient Athens, the Theatre of Dionysus was a very important part of their lives. Today it is considered to be the place where European theatre had its beginnings. ”
  • 49 íbúar mæla með
Annað útivist
“The green hill behind the Panathenaic Stadium whose foothills were crossed by the river Ilissus took its name from Ardettus, an ancient Athenian who resolved the differences between Athenians, and was the sacred site where the jurors took their oaths. There were important monuments on the hill like the Sanctuary of Tyche and the tomb of Herodes Atticus. Climbing to Ardettus with the paths among the pine trees is a rewarding experience due to the nature and the unique view to the city.”
  • 9 íbúar mæla með
Torg fyrir gangandi vegfarendur
“A great walk, around Acropolis of Athens, starts in front of Acropolis museum. It's worth it, you will see everything”
  • 5 íbúar mæla með
Sögufrægur staður
“The 5th-floor rooftop terrace of the boutique Herodion Hotel is the only one that provides views of both the Acropolis and the modern elegant lines of the Acropolis Museum, lit equally beautifully at night. The space is split between a Mediterranean fine-dining restaurant and a bar that serves ‘tapas cocktails’. 4, Rovertou Galli st. ”
  • 4 íbúar mæla með

Ferðir tengdar byggingalist

Sögufrægir staðir

Almenningsgarður
“Its first name for the National Garden until 1974 was "Royal Garden". The park is located next to the Greek Parliament and extends to the south where the Zappeion Palace is located opposite the Panathinaikos Stadium where the first Modern Olympic Games were held in 1896. The National Garden is 15.5 hectares. It is located in the center of Athens and, adding the garden of Zappeion with an area of ​​13 hectares, the park has an area of ​​28.5 hectares, ie a total of 285 acres. The garden houses ancient ruins, columns, mosaics, etc. At its southeastern end are the busts of Ioannis Kapodistrias, the great Philelina Eynardos, while at its southern end is the bust of the national poet Dionysios Solomos and Aristotle.”
  • 288 íbúar mæla með
Track Stadium
“When Pierre de Coubertin’s vision of reviving the Olympic Games became reality in 1896, the stadium where they would be held was not a random choice. Beneath the marble stands of the 204-metre long oval stadium were the ruins of a 4th century BC arena used for the Panathenaic Games, one of the four major athletic competitions of antiquity, and later by Roman gladiators. A private benefactor, Georgios Averoff, paid to have the stadium beautifully refitted with gleaming white stone from the same Pendeli quarry used millennia earlier to build the Acropolis, thus earning the venue its Greek name—Kallimarmaron, or beautiful marble. If climbing some 50 rows to reach the top of the world’s only all-marble stadium is daunting, walk up Eratosthenous and turn onto Archimidous Street to the rear entrance. This leads to a track around the stadium’s upper rim, a popular training run for local joggers. Follow the path through the Ardittos woods for one of the best views over the centre of Athens and the Acropolis.”
  • 239 íbúar mæla með
Sögufrægur staður
“The Temple of Olympian Zeus was actually built by the Romans in an attempt to gain favor with the Greeks they had just taken over. This was their attempt to show an appreciation for the Greeks and their culture and history. The Romans had such a respect for what the Greeks had achieved that they let them worship their own gods such as Zeus. This temple was built in the Roman Corinthian order of architecture and has suffered a lot over time. One of the fallen columns fell due to an earthquake not too long ago.”
  • 144 íbúar mæla með
Sögufrægur staður
“The commercial hub of ancient Athens, the Agora was once lined with statues and expensive shops, the favorite strolling ground of fashionable Athenians as well as a mecca for merchants and students. The long colonnades offered shade in summer and protection from rain in winter to the throng of people who transacted the day-to-day business of the city, and, under their arches, Socrates discussed matters with Plato, and Zeno expounded the philosophy of the Stoics (whose name comes from the six stoas, or colonnades of the Agora). Besides administrative buildings, the schools, theaters, workshops, houses, stores, and market stalls of a thriving town surrounded it. The foundations of some of the main buildings that may be most easily distinguished include the circular Tholos, the principal seat of executive power in the city; the Mitroon, shrine to Rhea, the mother of gods, which included the vast state archives and registry office (mitroon is still used today to mean registry); the Vouleuterion, where the council met; the Monument of Eponymous Heroes, the Agora's information center, where announcements such as the list of military recruits were hung; and the Sanctuary of the Twelve Gods, a shelter for refugees and the point from which all distances were measured. The Agora's showpiece was the Stoa of Attalos II, where Socrates once lectured and incited the youth of Athens to adopt his progressive ideas on mortality and morality. Today the Museum of Agora Excavations, this two-story building was first designed as a retail complex and erected in the 2nd century BC by Attalos, a king of Pergamum. The reconstruction in 1953–56 used Pendelic marble and creamy limestone from the original structure. The colonnade, designed for promenades, is protected from the blistering sun and cooled by breezes. The most notable sculptures, of historical and mythological figures from the 3rd and 4th centuries BC, are at ground level outside the museum. Take a walk around the site and speculate on the location of Simon the Cobbler's house and shop, which was a meeting place for Socrates and his pupils. The carefully landscaped grounds display a number of plants known in antiquity, such as almond, myrtle, and pomegranate. By standing in the center, you have a glorious view up to the Acropolis. Ayii Apostoloi is the only one of the Agora's nine churches to survive, saved because of its location and beauty. A quirky ruin to visit here is the 1st Century AD latrine in the northeastern corner. On the low hill called Kolonos Agoraios in the Agora's northwest corner stands the best-preserved Doric temple in all Greece, the Hephaistion, sometimes called the Thission because of its friezes showing the exploits of Theseus. Like the other monuments, it is roped off, but you can walk around it to admire its preservation. A little older than the Parthenon, it is surrounded by 34 columns and is 104 feet in length, and was once filled with sculptures (the only remnant of which is the mutilated frieze, once brightly colored). It never quite makes the impact of the Parthenon, in large part due to the fact that it lacks a noble site and can never be seen from below, its sun-matured columns towering heavenward. The Hephaistion was originally dedicated to Hephaistos, god of metalworkers, and it is interesting to note that metal workshops still exist in this area near Ifestou Street.”
  • 116 íbúar mæla með
Sögufrægur staður
“The Parthenon is the ultimate symbol. It is the universal symbol, the symbol of the civilization of civilizations and from this symbolism UNESCO chose it in the most absolute way as an emblem of the world, as an emblem of the common history of the human species. And rightly asked an unprecedented question, not to be answered but to always remain a question of reflection and reflection. "Can a unique monument serve as a symbol of both nationality and international culture?" (M. Beard).”
  • 96 íbúar mæla með
Sögufrægur staður
“This is spectacular. A really well preserved and restored ancient Greek theatre. The Odeon was specifically used by the ancient Greeks for musical performances. It is said that the ancient Greeks mastered the design of this Odeon so well that they achieved perfect acoustics. This is still such an impressive achievement that the Odeon is still used for performances in modern times. Herodes Atticus is the name of the Greek who funded the operation and patronage. This is a great photo spot and a lovely first stop on the tour of The Acropolis.”
  • 116 íbúar mæla með
Sögufrægur staður
“For gastronomy and no only. One neighbour greek loves, for food and cocktails. No so touristic atmosphere for this tourist loves.”
  • 67 íbúar mæla með
Sögufrægur staður
“You don't have to look far in Athens to encounter perfection. Towering above all—both physically and spiritually—stands the Acropolis, a millennia-old survivor. The Greek term Acropolis means High City, and today's traveler who climbs this table-like hill is paying tribute to the prime source of Western civilization. Most of the notable structures on this flat-top limestone outcrop, 512 feet high, were built from 461 to 429 BC, when the intellectual and artistic life of Athens flowered under the influence of the Athenian statesman Pericles. Since then, the buildings of the Acropolis have undergone transformations into, at various times, a Florentine palace, an Islamic mosque, and a Turkish harem. They have also weathered the hazards of wars, right up to 1944, when British paratroopers positioned their bazookas between the Parthenon's columns. Today, the Erechtheion temple has been completely restored, and conservation work on the Parthenon is ongoing, focusing now on the western side. With most of the major restoration work now completed, a visit to the Acropolis evokes the spirit of the ancient heroes and gods who were once worshiped here. The sight of the Parthenon—the Panathenaic temple at the crest of this ieros vrachos (sacred rock) —has the power to stir the heart as few other ancient relics do. The walk through the Acropolis takes about four hours, depending on the crowds, including an hour spent in the New Acropolis Museum. In general, the earlier you start out the better—in summer the heat is blistering by noon and the light's reflection off the rock and marble ruins is almost blinding. Remember to bring water, sunscreen, nonslip footwear, and a hat to protect yourself from the sun. An alternative, in summer, is to visit after 5 pm, when the light is best for taking photographs. The two hours before sunset, when the fabled violet light occasionally spreads from the crest of Mt. Hymettus and embraces the Acropolis, is an ideal time to visit in any season. After dark the hill is spectacularly floodlighted, creating a scene visible from many parts of the capital. You enter the Acropolis complex through the Beulé Gate, a late-Roman structure named for the French archaeologist who discovered the gate in 1852. Before Roman times, the entrance to the Acropolis was a steep ramp below the Temple of Athena Nike that was used every fourth year for the Panathenaic procession, a spectacle that honored Athena's remarkable birth (she sprang from the head of her father, Zeus). When you enter the gate, ask for the free, information-packed bilingual (in English and Greek) pamphlet guide. At the loftiest point of the Acropolis stands the Parthenon, the architectural masterpiece conceived by Pericles and executed between 447 and 438 BC. It not only raised the bar in terms of sheer size, but also in the perfection of its proportions. Dedicated to the goddess Athena (the name comes from the Athena Parthenos, the virgin Athena), the Parthenon served primarily as the treasury of the Delian League, an ancient alliance of cities formed to defeat the Persian incursion. In fact, the Parthenon was built as much to honor the city's power as to venerate the goddess. After the Persian army sacked Athens in 480-479 BC, the city-state banded with Sparta, and together they routed the Persians by 449 BC. To proclaim its hegemony over all Greece, Athens then set about constructing its Acropolis, ending a 30-year building moratorium. Once you pass through the Beulé Gate you will find the Temple of Athena Nike. Designed by Kallikrates, the mini-temple was built in 427–424 BC to celebrate peace with Persia. The bas-reliefs on the surrounding parapet depict the Victories leading heifers to be sacrificed. Past the temple, the imposing Propylaea structure was designed to instill the proper reverence in worshipers as they crossed from the temporal world into the spiritual world of the sanctuary, for this was the main function of the Acropolis. The Propylaea was intended to have been the same size as the Parthenon, and thus the grandest secular building in Greece, but construction was suspended during the Peloponnesian War, and it was never finished. The structure shows the first use of the Attic style, which combines both Doric and Ionic columns. The building's slender Ionic columns had elegant capitals, some of which have been restored along with a section of the famed paneled ceiling, originally decorated with gold, eight-pointed stars on a blue background. Adjacent to the Pinakotheke, or art gallery (which has paintings of scenes from Homer's epics and mythological tableaux), the south wing is a decorative portico (row of columns). The view from the inner porch of the Propylaea is stunning: the Parthenon is suddenly revealed in its full glory, framed by the columns. If the Parthenon is the masterpiece of Doric architecture, the Erechtheion is undoubtedly the prime exemplar of the more graceful Ionic order. A considerably smaller structure than the Parthenon, it outmatches, for sheer elegance and refinement of design, all other buildings of the Greco-Roman world. For the populace, the Erechtheion, completed in 406 BC, remained Athena's holiest shrine, for legend has it that Poseidon plunged his trident into the rock on this spot, dramatically producing a spring of water, while Athena created a simple olive tree, whose produce remains a main staple of Greek society. A panel of judges declared the goddess the winner, and the city was named Athena. The most delightful feature is the south portico, known as the Caryatid Porch. It is supported on the heads of six maidens (caryatids) wearing delicately draped Ionian garments. What you see at the site today are copies; the originals are in the New Acropolis Museum. Most people take the metro to the Acropolis station, where the Acropolis Museum is just across the main exit. They then follow the Dionyssiou Aeropagitou, the pedestrianized street which traces the foothill of the Acropolis to its entrance at the Beulé Gate. Another entrance is along the rock's northern face via the pretty Peripatos, a paved path from the Plaka district. The summit of the Acropolis can also now be reached by people with disabilities via an elevator. Don't throw away your Acropolis ticket after your tour. It will get you into all the other sites in the Unification of Archaeological Sites for five days— at no extra cost. Guides to the Acropolis are quite informative and will also help kids understand the site better.”
  • 58 íbúar mæla með

Lista- og safnferðir

Bókasöfn

Library
“Beautiful architecture. The National Library of Greece is situated near the center of the city of Athens. The library has a large number of Greek manuscripts which is one of the greatest collections of Greek scripts. There are also many chrysobulla and archives of the Greek Revolution. ”
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Cultural Center
“The "Estia of Nea Smyrni" is a cultural institution based in Nea Smyrni founded in 1930 with the aim of preserving the historical memory of the Greek refugees from Smyrni (Izmir) and Asia Minor in general. It is a non-profit association.”
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Library
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Library
“Businessman turned diplomat John Gennadius inherited two passions from his father: a love of books and a love of Greece. These fused in a collection of some 26,000 books which he then donated to the American School of Classical Studies. The library and its strolling grounds are as impressive as the collection. Entering, your eye will be drawn to the columns and the Isocrates inscription over the door that reads ‘They are called Greeks who share in our culture’, but tilt your head back to take in details like the delicate inlay on the ceiling. Indoors, there’s plenty to see, even when the library isn’t hosting an exhibition. The reading room by itself induces a hushed awe; watercolours by Edward Lear and Lord Byron memorabilia are a bonus.”
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Library

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